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Modern versus classical education: The Dutch case 1863‐1917

Modern versus classical education: The Dutch case 1863‐1917 The position of the relatively new non‐classical education as opposed to traditional classical education was the subject of intense discussion in the Netherlands from the second half of the nineteenth century onwards. The Dutch case was not unique, however. In Western Europe the traditional form of secondary education, with Greek and Latin as key subjects, long retained its dominant status. The classical languages were considered essential if sons of the elite were to become civilised men with disciplined minds, a refined sense of human cultural values and a coherent general education. This educational ideal ‐ culture generale in France and Bildung in Germany ‐ embraced the classics at the expense of professional expertise and knowledge about modern society. A focus on commerce and technology was considered inferior. The Bildung ideal rejected practicality and purposeful work in favour of leisured cultivation and aesthetic interests. Yet modern education slowly grew in status, and non‐classical schools sought to gain greater dominance in the school system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Modern versus classical education: The Dutch case 1863‐1917

History of Education Review , Volume 34 (1): 16 – Jun 24, 2005

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691200500003
Publisher site
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Abstract

The position of the relatively new non‐classical education as opposed to traditional classical education was the subject of intense discussion in the Netherlands from the second half of the nineteenth century onwards. The Dutch case was not unique, however. In Western Europe the traditional form of secondary education, with Greek and Latin as key subjects, long retained its dominant status. The classical languages were considered essential if sons of the elite were to become civilised men with disciplined minds, a refined sense of human cultural values and a coherent general education. This educational ideal ‐ culture generale in France and Bildung in Germany ‐ embraced the classics at the expense of professional expertise and knowledge about modern society. A focus on commerce and technology was considered inferior. The Bildung ideal rejected practicality and purposeful work in favour of leisured cultivation and aesthetic interests. Yet modern education slowly grew in status, and non‐classical schools sought to gain greater dominance in the school system.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 24, 2005

Keywords: Modern; Classics; Education; Dutch

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