Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Modern” learning methods: rhetoric and reality

“Modern” learning methods: rhetoric and reality The application of technology in both its “hard” (for example through computing technology) and “soft” (for example through instructional design ) forms has enhanced the range of training methods available to practitioners. Much rhetoric has surrounded the use of techniques such as distance learning and computer‐based learning methods. The study aimed to explore the attitudes of managers to these “modern” approaches and other more “traditional” methods. A questionnaire survey of over 200 managers in organisations of all sizes and from a range of sectors was conducted. The data suggest that distance learning is not widely used as it is perceived as less effective, whereas at‐job learning, as well as being widely used is also perceived as being the most effective method. An analysis in terms of firm size revealed more similarities than differences between larger and smaller firms. The theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Review Emerald Publishing

“Modern” learning methods: rhetoric and reality

Personnel Review , Volume 29 (4): 17 – Aug 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/modern-learning-methods-rhetoric-and-reality-mrgg4y0qy4

References (41)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0048-3486
DOI
10.1108/00483480010296285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The application of technology in both its “hard” (for example through computing technology) and “soft” (for example through instructional design ) forms has enhanced the range of training methods available to practitioners. Much rhetoric has surrounded the use of techniques such as distance learning and computer‐based learning methods. The study aimed to explore the attitudes of managers to these “modern” approaches and other more “traditional” methods. A questionnaire survey of over 200 managers in organisations of all sizes and from a range of sectors was conducted. The data suggest that distance learning is not widely used as it is perceived as less effective, whereas at‐job learning, as well as being widely used is also perceived as being the most effective method. An analysis in terms of firm size revealed more similarities than differences between larger and smaller firms. The theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.

Journal

Personnel ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2000

Keywords: On‐the‐job training; Computer‐based training,Open learning; Small firms

There are no references for this article.