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Misplaced marketing: Landmines and the misplaced marketing of destruction

Misplaced marketing: Landmines and the misplaced marketing of destruction From a humanitarian standpoint, “antipersonnel landmines” are condemned for the indiscriminate terror they inflict on civilian populations. A functional tool of battle, landmines provide conflict between the production of a product that the military customer desires but one that does not serve the needs of humanity. Claims by component producers that they are unaware of the destination of their product demonstrates either the divorce of marketing from production or an attempt to persuade critics that ignorance allows dissociation from responsibility. Producers of components and assemblers of landmines have been named by the anti‐landmine movement. The impact of such action is likely to negatively influence the perceptions of other products produced by these companies with the results on profitability. Furthermore, the growing movement towards accountability may leave producers and assemblers at risk of litigation. It is concluded that the production of a weapon that meets the needs of the military customer but does not meet the needs of humanity is an example of misplaced marketing. Firms involved in component production or assembly are well advised to cease such operations to ensure their profitability in the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Marketing Emerald Publishing

Misplaced marketing: Landmines and the misplaced marketing of destruction

Journal of Consumer Marketing , Volume 17 (3): 2 – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0736-3761
DOI
10.1108/07363760010328932
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From a humanitarian standpoint, “antipersonnel landmines” are condemned for the indiscriminate terror they inflict on civilian populations. A functional tool of battle, landmines provide conflict between the production of a product that the military customer desires but one that does not serve the needs of humanity. Claims by component producers that they are unaware of the destination of their product demonstrates either the divorce of marketing from production or an attempt to persuade critics that ignorance allows dissociation from responsibility. Producers of components and assemblers of landmines have been named by the anti‐landmine movement. The impact of such action is likely to negatively influence the perceptions of other products produced by these companies with the results on profitability. Furthermore, the growing movement towards accountability may leave producers and assemblers at risk of litigation. It is concluded that the production of a weapon that meets the needs of the military customer but does not meet the needs of humanity is an example of misplaced marketing. Firms involved in component production or assembly are well advised to cease such operations to ensure their profitability in the future.

Journal

Journal of Consumer MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2000

Keywords: Ethics; Social responsibility; Marketing strategy

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