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Midwifery – From Parasite to Partner in the Ontario Health Care System

Midwifery – From Parasite to Partner in the Ontario Health Care System Using several frameworks for public policy analysis, documents how midwifery in Ontario evolved from being illegal in 1982 to being a self‐regulated health profession in 1990. In 1985, the Ontario Government agreed that midwifery should be “legalized”; but how to do it was the question. The lobbying efforts of two coalitions armed with research‐based evidence influenced the policy decision process. Coalition A favoured midwifery becoming a self‐regulated health profession based on their beliefs that: (1) childbirth should be “de‐medicalized” and (2) the parents have a right to choose. Coalition B favoured the medical model and believed that “treatment was better”; it opposed home births, in general, and midwifery being self‐regulated, in particular. Also examines future implications of the Midwife Act. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Manpower Management Emerald Publishing

Midwifery – From Parasite to Partner in the Ontario Health Care System

Health Manpower Management , Volume 20 (5): 9 – Dec 1, 1994

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0955-2065
DOI
10.1108/09552069410070642
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using several frameworks for public policy analysis, documents how midwifery in Ontario evolved from being illegal in 1982 to being a self‐regulated health profession in 1990. In 1985, the Ontario Government agreed that midwifery should be “legalized”; but how to do it was the question. The lobbying efforts of two coalitions armed with research‐based evidence influenced the policy decision process. Coalition A favoured midwifery becoming a self‐regulated health profession based on their beliefs that: (1) childbirth should be “de‐medicalized” and (2) the parents have a right to choose. Coalition B favoured the medical model and believed that “treatment was better”; it opposed home births, in general, and midwifery being self‐regulated, in particular. Also examines future implications of the Midwife Act.

Journal

Health Manpower ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1994

Keywords: Canada; Coalitions; Health care; Legislation; Lobbying; Maternity services; Medical professions; Midwives; Policy; Women

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