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Memoryless Trading

Memoryless Trading An optimal investment strategy is memoryless, because it depends on present and expected future conditions, but not on the past. This article discusses the conditions required for a single, optimal investment strategy which the authors refer to as the memoryless trading rule. As a normative theory for investment decisions, memoryless trading requires an investment strategy or future course of action to describe what the trader will do when the markets achieve a given state. Memoryless trading also implies that when traders share a common utility function which incorporates their risk preferences, wealth level, and trading orientation, there is a single, optimal investment strategy based upon market conditions. The authors show how some standard financial tools for comparing traders and measuring riskadjusted portfolio performance, e.g., the Sharpe ratio, violate the memoryless trading rule. They also discuss the relationship between memoryless trading and traditional equilibrium models of asset pricing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Risk Finance Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1526-5943
DOI
10.1108/eb043450
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An optimal investment strategy is memoryless, because it depends on present and expected future conditions, but not on the past. This article discusses the conditions required for a single, optimal investment strategy which the authors refer to as the memoryless trading rule. As a normative theory for investment decisions, memoryless trading requires an investment strategy or future course of action to describe what the trader will do when the markets achieve a given state. Memoryless trading also implies that when traders share a common utility function which incorporates their risk preferences, wealth level, and trading orientation, there is a single, optimal investment strategy based upon market conditions. The authors show how some standard financial tools for comparing traders and measuring riskadjusted portfolio performance, e.g., the Sharpe ratio, violate the memoryless trading rule. They also discuss the relationship between memoryless trading and traditional equilibrium models of asset pricing.

Journal

The Journal of Risk FinanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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