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Mechanism design of a biomimetic quadruped robot

Mechanism design of a biomimetic quadruped robot PurposeThis paper aims to introduce a novel design of the biomimetic quadruped robot, including its body structure, three structural modes and respective workspace.Design/methodology/approachBy taking a metamorphic 8-bar linkage as the body of a quadruped robot, the authors propose a reconfigurable walking robot that can imitate three kinds of animals: mammals (e.g. dog), arthropods (e.g. stick insect) and reptiles (e.g. lizard). Furthermore, to analyze the three structural modes of this quadruped robot, the workspace is calculated and studied.FindingsBased on experimental data analyses, it is revealed that the metamorphic quadruped robot can walk in all its three structural modes and adapt to different terrains.Research limitations/implicationsBecause the body of the quadruped robot is deformable and reconfigurable, the location of payload is not considered in the current stage.Practical implicationsThe relative positions and postures of legs of the metamorphic robot can be rearranged during its body reconfiguration in such a way to combine all the features of locomotion of the three kinds of animals into one robot. So, the metamorphic quadruped robot is capable of maintaining wider stability margins than conventional rigid-body quadruped robots and conducting operations in different environments, particularly the extreme and restricted occasions due to the changeable and adaptable trunk.Originality/valueThe main contribution is the development of a reconfigurable biomimetic quadruped robot, which uses the metamorphic 8-bar linkage. This robot can easily reshape to three different structural modes and mimic the walking patterns of all mammals, arthropods and reptiles. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Robot: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Mechanism design of a biomimetic quadruped robot

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0143-991X
DOI
10.1108/IR-11-2016-0310
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis paper aims to introduce a novel design of the biomimetic quadruped robot, including its body structure, three structural modes and respective workspace.Design/methodology/approachBy taking a metamorphic 8-bar linkage as the body of a quadruped robot, the authors propose a reconfigurable walking robot that can imitate three kinds of animals: mammals (e.g. dog), arthropods (e.g. stick insect) and reptiles (e.g. lizard). Furthermore, to analyze the three structural modes of this quadruped robot, the workspace is calculated and studied.FindingsBased on experimental data analyses, it is revealed that the metamorphic quadruped robot can walk in all its three structural modes and adapt to different terrains.Research limitations/implicationsBecause the body of the quadruped robot is deformable and reconfigurable, the location of payload is not considered in the current stage.Practical implicationsThe relative positions and postures of legs of the metamorphic robot can be rearranged during its body reconfiguration in such a way to combine all the features of locomotion of the three kinds of animals into one robot. So, the metamorphic quadruped robot is capable of maintaining wider stability margins than conventional rigid-body quadruped robots and conducting operations in different environments, particularly the extreme and restricted occasions due to the changeable and adaptable trunk.Originality/valueThe main contribution is the development of a reconfigurable biomimetic quadruped robot, which uses the metamorphic 8-bar linkage. This robot can easily reshape to three different structural modes and mimic the walking patterns of all mammals, arthropods and reptiles.

Journal

Industrial Robot: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 19, 2017

References