Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Measuring gender differences in cognitive functioning

Measuring gender differences in cognitive functioning Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate students. Design/methodology/approach – The participants for this study were selected at random from the overall LASSI sampling exercise and males and females were compared using the LASSI scales at a Hong Kong University. Findings – Gender differences in cognitive functioning and achievement do not always favour one sex with the literature related to intelligence testing suggesting that males outperform females on tests of visuo‐spatial ability, and mathematical reasoning whereas females do better on tests involving memory and language use. This paper examines relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores (LASSI) of undergraduate students and argues that whilst there are significant gender differences in A‐level scores, these provide limited practical information at a cognitive level. In contrast, the data from LASSI allows a more detailed and practical metacognitive analysis suggesting significant gender differences in certain areas of self‐perceived performance, with females demonstrating significantly higher levels of self‐regulation and a more positive attitude to academic study than their male counterparts. Originality/value – The analysis of the data produced by the LASSI indicates that there are significant differences in self‐perceived metacognition between the genders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multicultural Education & Technology Journal Emerald Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/measuring-gender-differences-in-cognitive-functioning-9jc0suuaTY
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1750-497X
DOI
10.1108/17504970810867124
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate students. Design/methodology/approach – The participants for this study were selected at random from the overall LASSI sampling exercise and males and females were compared using the LASSI scales at a Hong Kong University. Findings – Gender differences in cognitive functioning and achievement do not always favour one sex with the literature related to intelligence testing suggesting that males outperform females on tests of visuo‐spatial ability, and mathematical reasoning whereas females do better on tests involving memory and language use. This paper examines relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores (LASSI) of undergraduate students and argues that whilst there are significant gender differences in A‐level scores, these provide limited practical information at a cognitive level. In contrast, the data from LASSI allows a more detailed and practical metacognitive analysis suggesting significant gender differences in certain areas of self‐perceived performance, with females demonstrating significantly higher levels of self‐regulation and a more positive attitude to academic study than their male counterparts. Originality/value – The analysis of the data produced by the LASSI indicates that there are significant differences in self‐perceived metacognition between the genders.

Journal

Multicultural Education & Technology JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 11, 2008

Keywords: Gender; Cognition; Qualifications; Examinations; Undergraduates; Hong Kong

References