Measuring attitudinal commitment in business‐to‐business channels

Measuring attitudinal commitment in business‐to‐business channels While organizational behaviourists have largely adopted a three‐component conceptualisation of attitudinal commitment, marketers continue exclusively to apply one‐ or two‐component models. In this paper, the reliability and validity of one‐, two‐ and three‐component models of commitment are examined within a business‐to‐business context. The results indicate that the three‐component model incorporating instrumental, affective and normative dimensions is superior on both substantive and empirical grounds. It is subsequently argued that marketing planners need to demand that marketing researchers are more precise when incorporating commitment into conceptual and empirical studies, and account for these distinct components either by explicitly including or omitting them. It is also argued that marketing managers can enhance channel relationships if they are cognisant of the three distinct types of attitudinal commitments when formulating channel management tactics and strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marketing Intelligence & Planning Emerald Publishing

Measuring attitudinal commitment in business‐to‐business channels

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, Volume 22 (6): 16 – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0263-4503
DOI
10.1108/02634500410559024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While organizational behaviourists have largely adopted a three‐component conceptualisation of attitudinal commitment, marketers continue exclusively to apply one‐ or two‐component models. In this paper, the reliability and validity of one‐, two‐ and three‐component models of commitment are examined within a business‐to‐business context. The results indicate that the three‐component model incorporating instrumental, affective and normative dimensions is superior on both substantive and empirical grounds. It is subsequently argued that marketing planners need to demand that marketing researchers are more precise when incorporating commitment into conceptual and empirical studies, and account for these distinct components either by explicitly including or omitting them. It is also argued that marketing managers can enhance channel relationships if they are cognisant of the three distinct types of attitudinal commitments when formulating channel management tactics and strategies.

Journal

Marketing Intelligence & PlanningEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2004

Keywords: Attitudes; Business‐to‐business marketing; Channel relationships; Supply chain management

References

  • Business relationships: an examination of the effects of buyer‐salesperson relationships on customer retention and willingness to refer and recommend
    Boles, J.S.; Barksdale, H.C. Jr; Johnson, J.T.
  • Two sides to attitudinal commitment: the effect of calculative and loyalty commitment on enforcement mechanisms in distribution channels
    Gilliland, D.I.; Bello, D.C.
  • Can applied entrepreneurship education enhance job satisfaction and financial performance? An empirical investigation in the Australian pharmacy profession
    Hindle, K.; Cutting, N.
  • Measurment of distributor commitment in industrial channels of distribution
    Kim, K.; Frazier, G.L.
  • Salesperson cooperation: the influence of relational, task, organizational, and personal factors
    Yilmaz, C.; Hunt, S.D.

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