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May the worst man win

May the worst man win This article presents the author’s premise that success in business requires a high degree of self‐serving behavior and exclusionary methods on the part of a company’s leaders. Using numerous examples, including Tom Watson at IBM, Bill Gates at Microsoft, Andy Grove at Intel, Phil Knight at Nike, and Robert Moses in New York City, he shows how both savory and unsavory human behaviors help to accomplish objectives and eventually find their way into commercial settings. Thus, aggressive and manipulative business dealings are a direct result of basic human nature. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strategy & Leadership Emerald Publishing

May the worst man win

Strategy & Leadership , Volume 28 (3): 4 – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1087-8572
DOI
10.1108/10878570010348576
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article presents the author’s premise that success in business requires a high degree of self‐serving behavior and exclusionary methods on the part of a company’s leaders. Using numerous examples, including Tom Watson at IBM, Bill Gates at Microsoft, Andy Grove at Intel, Phil Knight at Nike, and Robert Moses in New York City, he shows how both savory and unsavory human behaviors help to accomplish objectives and eventually find their way into commercial settings. Thus, aggressive and manipulative business dealings are a direct result of basic human nature.

Journal

Strategy & LeadershipEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2000

Keywords: Competitive strategy; Marketing; Success; Leadership

References