Managing urban water in Australia: the planned and the unplanned

Managing urban water in Australia: the planned and the unplanned Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify factors contributing to the success of demand management measures in a period of severe water shortage in urban areas of Queensland, Australia; to reflect on the role of demand management measures as a policy tool integral to Australia's National Water Initiative . Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form of a case study and literature review. Findings – Australia's National Water Initiative , with its emphasis on market‐based reform, failed to provide adequate mechanisms for dealing with severe drought in Australia's urban areas. In contrast, a mix of regulatory, fiscal and educational initiatives encouraged Brisbane residents to reduce their water consumption by 57 per cent. These initiatives were successful because they formed part of a comprehensive, pervasive and persistent campaign delivered by two tiers of government working in conjunction and exhibiting strong local leadership. Originality/value – The paper identifies the need to include demand management measures – including regulatory, fiscal and educational measures – as well as market‐based reforms in national water policy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Managing urban water in Australia: the planned and the unplanned

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1477-7835
DOI
10.1108/14777830910981258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify factors contributing to the success of demand management measures in a period of severe water shortage in urban areas of Queensland, Australia; to reflect on the role of demand management measures as a policy tool integral to Australia's National Water Initiative . Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form of a case study and literature review. Findings – Australia's National Water Initiative , with its emphasis on market‐based reform, failed to provide adequate mechanisms for dealing with severe drought in Australia's urban areas. In contrast, a mix of regulatory, fiscal and educational initiatives encouraged Brisbane residents to reduce their water consumption by 57 per cent. These initiatives were successful because they formed part of a comprehensive, pervasive and persistent campaign delivered by two tiers of government working in conjunction and exhibiting strong local leadership. Originality/value – The paper identifies the need to include demand management measures – including regulatory, fiscal and educational measures – as well as market‐based reforms in national water policy.

Journal

Management of Environmental Quality: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 7, 2009

Keywords: Water; Water supply; Demand management; Consumer behaviour; Australia

References

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