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Managing the work-family interface: experience of construction project managers

Managing the work-family interface: experience of construction project managers Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family experience of projects managers working in the construction industry, and identify how they manage their work-family interface. Design/methodology/approach – Structured interviews were conducted with nine construction project managers working in the commercial sector, and data were subject to thematic analysis. Findings – Role conditions were found to impact on participants’ work-family interface, identified as working hours, accountability, and the stress arising from accountability. Participants identified four key strategies used to manage their work-family interface: managing work-based stress, having a supportive partner, prioritising non-work time for family, and trading off activities. Despite having to limit time with family and trade off social and leisure activities, participants did not report negative work-to-family spillover. All participants shared a passion for their work. Findings can be explained using the heavy worker investment model, which proposes that job devotion is linked to psychological well-being, decreases in work-family conflict (WFC), and work satisfaction. Originality/value – Contrary to previous research, findings suggest that construction project managers did not experience inter-role conflict between their work and family domains. It is recommended that further research explore these findings using the heavy work investment (HWI) framework which considers how internal and external predictors shape workers’ behaviour, and whether HWI typologies moderate the experience of WFC. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Managing Projects in Business Emerald Publishing

Managing the work-family interface: experience of construction project managers

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1753-8378
DOI
10.1108/IJMPB-07-2015-0057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family experience of projects managers working in the construction industry, and identify how they manage their work-family interface. Design/methodology/approach – Structured interviews were conducted with nine construction project managers working in the commercial sector, and data were subject to thematic analysis. Findings – Role conditions were found to impact on participants’ work-family interface, identified as working hours, accountability, and the stress arising from accountability. Participants identified four key strategies used to manage their work-family interface: managing work-based stress, having a supportive partner, prioritising non-work time for family, and trading off activities. Despite having to limit time with family and trade off social and leisure activities, participants did not report negative work-to-family spillover. All participants shared a passion for their work. Findings can be explained using the heavy worker investment model, which proposes that job devotion is linked to psychological well-being, decreases in work-family conflict (WFC), and work satisfaction. Originality/value – Contrary to previous research, findings suggest that construction project managers did not experience inter-role conflict between their work and family domains. It is recommended that further research explore these findings using the heavy work investment (HWI) framework which considers how internal and external predictors shape workers’ behaviour, and whether HWI typologies moderate the experience of WFC.

Journal

International Journal of Managing Projects in BusinessEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 4, 2016

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