Management training ‐ are business schools out of touch with their market?

Management training ‐ are business schools out of touch with their market? Describes how business schools are currently facing a recruitment crisis. Increased competition and smaller numbers of students have placed many business programmes in jeopardy. Clearly business schools need to get closer to industry and structure their programmes to match the needs of employers if they are to be able to survive into the long term. Reports the findings of research carried out to ascertain the needs of employers in Exeter. A postal survey was undertaken of 400 employers employing over 50 employees on a given site to ascertain in detail the scope and nature of the management training they were currently supporting. Data were also gathered in respect of the attitudes of employers to business schools and the criteria they apply to assist in their selection. Shows that Devonian employers are spending well under half the national average on training and a greater percentage of that training is now undertaken in‐house. Management education continues to be a priority for most businesses although there are mixed perceptions in respect of the most appropriate mode of delivery. Finds that a greater participation with local enterprise is called for, together with the possible adoption of a consortia‐based management programme which would incorporate a greater degree of flexibility to allow employers to “pick and mix” the training they require. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of European Industrial Training Emerald Publishing

Management training ‐ are business schools out of touch with their market?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/management-training-are-business-schools-out-of-touch-with-their-wTOeqCdi8y
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0309-0590
DOI
10.1108/03090599610117027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Describes how business schools are currently facing a recruitment crisis. Increased competition and smaller numbers of students have placed many business programmes in jeopardy. Clearly business schools need to get closer to industry and structure their programmes to match the needs of employers if they are to be able to survive into the long term. Reports the findings of research carried out to ascertain the needs of employers in Exeter. A postal survey was undertaken of 400 employers employing over 50 employees on a given site to ascertain in detail the scope and nature of the management training they were currently supporting. Data were also gathered in respect of the attitudes of employers to business schools and the criteria they apply to assist in their selection. Shows that Devonian employers are spending well under half the national average on training and a greater percentage of that training is now undertaken in‐house. Management education continues to be a priority for most businesses although there are mixed perceptions in respect of the most appropriate mode of delivery. Finds that a greater participation with local enterprise is called for, together with the possible adoption of a consortia‐based management programme which would incorporate a greater degree of flexibility to allow employers to “pick and mix” the training they require.

Journal

Journal of European Industrial TrainingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1996

Keywords: Business schools; Employers; Management development; Training

References

  • New approaches to management training and qualifications
    Fuller, A.
  • The training needs of small business
    Sargeant, A.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off