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Management as a science: emerging trends in economic and managerial theory

Management as a science: emerging trends in economic and managerial theory This paper considers the scientific development of business education on the basis of five criteria: if‐then statements, freedom from values, spatial and temporal validity, objectivity, and falsifiability. Methodologically, the emphasis is placed on emerging scientific and societal trends which influence scientific research and the paper is aimed primarily at academics. The paper also has an implicit politico‐scientific theme. Considering the multiplicity of approaches in management education, any attempt to take an overall perspective is likely to be controversial. Specific themes include the interdependence problem, uncertainty, dynamics, the development of various theoretical paradigms and trends such as globalisation and ecological consciousness. The context of analysis and discussion is predominantly that of German management theory and, in this sense, the paper provides a different perspective from that of other English‐language contributions in the area. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management History (Archive) Emerald Publishing

Management as a science: emerging trends in economic and managerial theory

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1355-252X
DOI
10.1108/13552520010326294
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper considers the scientific development of business education on the basis of five criteria: if‐then statements, freedom from values, spatial and temporal validity, objectivity, and falsifiability. Methodologically, the emphasis is placed on emerging scientific and societal trends which influence scientific research and the paper is aimed primarily at academics. The paper also has an implicit politico‐scientific theme. Considering the multiplicity of approaches in management education, any attempt to take an overall perspective is likely to be controversial. Specific themes include the interdependence problem, uncertainty, dynamics, the development of various theoretical paradigms and trends such as globalisation and ecological consciousness. The context of analysis and discussion is predominantly that of German management theory and, in this sense, the paper provides a different perspective from that of other English‐language contributions in the area.

Journal

Journal of Management History (Archive)Emerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 2000

Keywords: Business education; Development; Management education; Trends

References