Maleic anhydride grafted LLDPE modified polyamide and fabrics waste containing PET blends

Maleic anhydride grafted LLDPE modified polyamide and fabrics waste containing PET blends Purpose – To convert the post‐production polyethylene terephthalate (PET)‐containing fabrics waste into new value‐added polymeric materials using maleic anhydride grafted linear low‐density polyethylene (LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH) for improved toughness and to optimise the results of such a modification. Design/methodology/approach – For effective toughening, various blends were made of polyamide 6 (PA) and post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste (PET) by incorporating different concentrations of maleic anhydride grafted, linear low‐density polyethylene (LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH). The reactions of LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH with blend components were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, solubility behaviour of the products in formic acid and rheological measurements. Blends investigated were prepared in a co‐rotating twin‐screw extruder and characterised by differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The static tensile property and impact strength of the blends were also measured. Findings – The modification of polyamide 6 and post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste using LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH showed significant enhancement of impact and interfacial adhesion over the unmodified one. The modification caused a chemical linkage between LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH and blend components which led not only to forming PA‐ co ‐LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH‐ co ‐PET copolymers, but also to ensuring the intrinsically strong chemical bonds across LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH phase/PET phase/PA matrix interface, which was the main cause to the improved impact strength and interface adhesion. The optimum results were obtained at 10 per cent of LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH. Research limitations/implications – The post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste used in the present context was defibrated before processing. Practical implications – The method developed provided a simple and practical solution to recycling and improving the toughness of post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste. Originality/value – The method of recycling post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste was novel and the new polymeric materials obtained could find numerous applications such as hybrid films, fibres and engineering polymers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

Maleic anhydride grafted LLDPE modified polyamide and fabrics waste containing PET blends

Pigment & Resin Technology, Volume 35 (1): 9 – Jan 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/maleic-anhydride-grafted-lldpe-modified-polyamide-and-fabrics-waste-HNTUyYkT0Q
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/03699420610637996
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To convert the post‐production polyethylene terephthalate (PET)‐containing fabrics waste into new value‐added polymeric materials using maleic anhydride grafted linear low‐density polyethylene (LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH) for improved toughness and to optimise the results of such a modification. Design/methodology/approach – For effective toughening, various blends were made of polyamide 6 (PA) and post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste (PET) by incorporating different concentrations of maleic anhydride grafted, linear low‐density polyethylene (LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH). The reactions of LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH with blend components were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, solubility behaviour of the products in formic acid and rheological measurements. Blends investigated were prepared in a co‐rotating twin‐screw extruder and characterised by differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The static tensile property and impact strength of the blends were also measured. Findings – The modification of polyamide 6 and post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste using LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH showed significant enhancement of impact and interfacial adhesion over the unmodified one. The modification caused a chemical linkage between LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH and blend components which led not only to forming PA‐ co ‐LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH‐ co ‐PET copolymers, but also to ensuring the intrinsically strong chemical bonds across LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH phase/PET phase/PA matrix interface, which was the main cause to the improved impact strength and interface adhesion. The optimum results were obtained at 10 per cent of LLDPE‐ g ‐MAH. Research limitations/implications – The post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste used in the present context was defibrated before processing. Practical implications – The method developed provided a simple and practical solution to recycling and improving the toughness of post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste. Originality/value – The method of recycling post‐production PET‐containing fabrics waste was novel and the new polymeric materials obtained could find numerous applications such as hybrid films, fibres and engineering polymers.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: Waste recovery; Polyamides; Fourier transforms; Recycling

References

  • Maleation of linear low‐density polyethylene by reactive processing
    Gaylord, N.G.; Mehta, R.; Mohan, D.R.; Kumar, V.
  • Handbook of Plastics Recycling

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off