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Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955

Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955 Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, Book reviews 1920-1955 Edited by LeeAnn G. Reynolds Louisiana State University Press Baton Rouge, LA vii+223pp. ISBN: 9780807165645 (hbk) Keywords Segregation, Racial instruction Review DOI 10.1108/HER-01-2018-0003 How did children understand and (dis)embody social segregation as an integral feature of the Jim Crow South before the civil rights movement? Where and how were they taught to do so? LeeAnn Reynolds’ new socio-cultural history argues that southern children were strategically socialized to adopt and replicate existing segregation ideologies through formal and informal means, which differed importantly for black and white children. Looking at the pre-civil rights era as a means to interrogate dominant ideologies and socialization techniques, the author examines how notions of segregation were generationally, institutionally and socially reproduced through children. Reynolds’ attention to children in this text is illuminating since youth perspectives often afford insights adults might omit or relegate. As such, central questions guiding her study ask: “How did white children come to believe the sky would fall if segregation were violated?” and “How, despite daily encounters with the injustice of the system, did black children learn to adhere to the code without experiencing ‘a constant state of fury?’” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, 1920-1955

History of Education Review , Volume 47 (1): 2 – Jun 4, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-01-2018-0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maintaining Segregation: Children and Racial Instruction in the South, Book reviews 1920-1955 Edited by LeeAnn G. Reynolds Louisiana State University Press Baton Rouge, LA vii+223pp. ISBN: 9780807165645 (hbk) Keywords Segregation, Racial instruction Review DOI 10.1108/HER-01-2018-0003 How did children understand and (dis)embody social segregation as an integral feature of the Jim Crow South before the civil rights movement? Where and how were they taught to do so? LeeAnn Reynolds’ new socio-cultural history argues that southern children were strategically socialized to adopt and replicate existing segregation ideologies through formal and informal means, which differed importantly for black and white children. Looking at the pre-civil rights era as a means to interrogate dominant ideologies and socialization techniques, the author examines how notions of segregation were generationally, institutionally and socially reproduced through children. Reynolds’ attention to children in this text is illuminating since youth perspectives often afford insights adults might omit or relegate. As such, central questions guiding her study ask: “How did white children come to believe the sky would fall if segregation were violated?” and “How, despite daily encounters with the injustice of the system, did black children learn to adhere to the code without experiencing ‘a constant state of fury?’”

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 4, 2018

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