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Maintaining data integrity by documenting the system Putting database policy in writing

Maintaining data integrity by documenting the system Putting database policy in writing Most libraries already have some documentation. Software vendors provide manuals for the outofthebox programs they sell. The bibliographic utilities also provide documentation, which libraries use for guidance on entering data into the utilities. System documentation may exist also in scattered guides, cheat sheets, and how to manuals that have been developed for staff use as the need has arisen. Relevant documentation may reside even in nonlibrary sources. With all this existing documentation, one might conclude that there is no need for yet more system documentation. Yet it is precisely because of the scattered nature of the documentation, the selective use of these sources, the inadequacy of some of the sources, and, most importantly, the need for standardized input into the database that there is a need to develop adequate documentation for a particular library's system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Hi Tech Emerald Publishing

Maintaining data integrity by documenting the system Putting database policy in writing

Library Hi Tech , Volume 10 (3): 10 – Mar 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0737-8831
DOI
10.1108/eb047854
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most libraries already have some documentation. Software vendors provide manuals for the outofthebox programs they sell. The bibliographic utilities also provide documentation, which libraries use for guidance on entering data into the utilities. System documentation may exist also in scattered guides, cheat sheets, and how to manuals that have been developed for staff use as the need has arisen. Relevant documentation may reside even in nonlibrary sources. With all this existing documentation, one might conclude that there is no need for yet more system documentation. Yet it is precisely because of the scattered nature of the documentation, the selective use of these sources, the inadequacy of some of the sources, and, most importantly, the need for standardized input into the database that there is a need to develop adequate documentation for a particular library's system.

Journal

Library Hi TechEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1992

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