Lubrication of NONMETALLIC BEARINGS AND GEARS

Lubrication of NONMETALLIC BEARINGS AND GEARS LAMINATED material from which nonmetallic bearings and gears are fabricated may consist of fabric or paper treated with a synthetic resin. In producing this material, rolls of paper or fabric are fed in at one end of an impregnator which imparts a coating of the resin varnish. The impregnated material is dried and cut into suitably sized sheets, which are placed in layers to form a block of the material. The block is next pressed by hydraulic pressure under heat. This causes the resin to soften and flow so that the paper or fabric laminations merge under the pressure, which is round about one ton per sq. in. As heating is continued, however, the resin sets and can no longer be affected by heat the laminations lose their separate identity and the material becomes a homogeneous mass. Another type of material much in use consists of asbestoswhich may or may not be in the form of asbestos clothlikewise impregnated with synthetic resin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Lubrication of NONMETALLIC BEARINGS AND GEARS

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, Volume 6 (1): 5 – Jan 1, 1954

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LAMINATED material from which nonmetallic bearings and gears are fabricated may consist of fabric or paper treated with a synthetic resin. In producing this material, rolls of paper or fabric are fed in at one end of an impregnator which imparts a coating of the resin varnish. The impregnated material is dried and cut into suitably sized sheets, which are placed in layers to form a block of the material. The block is next pressed by hydraulic pressure under heat. This causes the resin to soften and flow so that the paper or fabric laminations merge under the pressure, which is round about one ton per sq. in. As heating is continued, however, the resin sets and can no longer be affected by heat the laminations lose their separate identity and the material becomes a homogeneous mass. Another type of material much in use consists of asbestoswhich may or may not be in the form of asbestos clothlikewise impregnated with synthetic resin.

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1954

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