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Lubrication of MILITARY Diesel Engines in cold temperatures

Lubrication of MILITARY Diesel Engines in cold temperatures Lubricatio n of MILITAR Y Diese l Engines in cold temperatures I N a paper recently presented to the Diesel Engine Users' Association in London by Major-General C. Bullard, C.B., C.B.E.,, entitled "Diesel Usage in the Army," the author had much to say about lubrication, and wo reproduce below, in shortened form, those parts of his paper which dealt with this. Major-General Bullard told us that the Army had used detergent oils since 1943 and their use had been entirely satisfactory. When their use commenced initially, they were blamed for a number of cases of engine seizure due to loosened deposits which blocked oilways, bu t a very closely applied warning stipulation was made that, on changing over from normal types to detergent types, all lubricating channels and filters must be thoroughly flushed out. Filtering. Many types of filter have been tried, but the author stated that the evidence of trials came out strongly in favour of the air cleaner, which uses an oil bath and this is now more or less standard in Army Specifi­ cations. There is a disadvantage of the proportion­ ally large air cleaner required for the diesel as com­ pared with the S.I. engine. For lubricating oil, the engine manufacturers' standard filters have been retained but with the full flow types there is always the risk of their being overlooked under strenuous military field conditions, whereas by-pass filters obviated this eventuality. Oil Dilution for Cold Starting. Oil dilution to aid starting has been used success­ fully without engine warming in temperatures as low as —40°F. In temperatures down to -20°F. a 15 per cent dilution with diesel fuel can be used, and for temperatures down to —40°F. a 25 per cent dilution is required. Below this, engine warming is necessary, and is indeed helpful above this tempera­ Effect of Temperature on Starter Output. ture also. At extremely low temperatures engine 1. Available starter output. paralysis is considerable and as much as three hours' 2. Required starter output. preparation for starting is not unusual. 3. Limits of starter output without battery heating I n diluting the oil, the temperature of the engine and without reduction of starter resistance (e.g. thinning of oil, engine heating). is of great importance. If the engine is too warm, 4. Maximum increase of starter output using battery evaporation of the diesel fuel commences, and if too heating. cold, proper mixing does not occur. The method of pre-mixing in a heated container is sometimes slab and melted it in a pan with satisfactory results— adopted. Some operators are said to have drained obviously not a method officially recommended! their engine oil into the snow at the end of a day's When diluting crankcase oil it is important not to run and next morning to have picked up the frozen forget the auxiliary compressor and gearbox. Scientific LUBRICATION 19 April, 1953 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Lubrication of MILITARY Diesel Engines in cold temperatures

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 5 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1953

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052225
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lubricatio n of MILITAR Y Diese l Engines in cold temperatures I N a paper recently presented to the Diesel Engine Users' Association in London by Major-General C. Bullard, C.B., C.B.E.,, entitled "Diesel Usage in the Army," the author had much to say about lubrication, and wo reproduce below, in shortened form, those parts of his paper which dealt with this. Major-General Bullard told us that the Army had used detergent oils since 1943 and their use had been entirely satisfactory. When their use commenced initially, they were blamed for a number of cases of engine seizure due to loosened deposits which blocked oilways, bu t a very closely applied warning stipulation was made that, on changing over from normal types to detergent types, all lubricating channels and filters must be thoroughly flushed out. Filtering. Many types of filter have been tried, but the author stated that the evidence of trials came out strongly in favour of the air cleaner, which uses an oil bath and this is now more or less standard in Army Specifi­ cations. There is a disadvantage of the proportion­ ally large air cleaner required for the diesel as com­ pared with the S.I. engine. For lubricating oil, the engine manufacturers' standard filters have been retained but with the full flow types there is always the risk of their being overlooked under strenuous military field conditions, whereas by-pass filters obviated this eventuality. Oil Dilution for Cold Starting. Oil dilution to aid starting has been used success­ fully without engine warming in temperatures as low as —40°F. In temperatures down to -20°F. a 15 per cent dilution with diesel fuel can be used, and for temperatures down to —40°F. a 25 per cent dilution is required. Below this, engine warming is necessary, and is indeed helpful above this tempera­ Effect of Temperature on Starter Output. ture also. At extremely low temperatures engine 1. Available starter output. paralysis is considerable and as much as three hours' 2. Required starter output. preparation for starting is not unusual. 3. Limits of starter output without battery heating I n diluting the oil, the temperature of the engine and without reduction of starter resistance (e.g. thinning of oil, engine heating). is of great importance. If the engine is too warm, 4. Maximum increase of starter output using battery evaporation of the diesel fuel commences, and if too heating. cold, proper mixing does not occur. The method of pre-mixing in a heated container is sometimes slab and melted it in a pan with satisfactory results— adopted. Some operators are said to have drained obviously not a method officially recommended! their engine oil into the snow at the end of a day's When diluting crankcase oil it is important not to run and next morning to have picked up the frozen forget the auxiliary compressor and gearbox. Scientific LUBRICATION 19 April, 1953

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1953

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