Lubricants for Wiredrawing

Lubricants for Wiredrawing The PROCESS OF MAKING WIRE by drawing operations through dies, as distinct from hammering, though believed to be several thousand years old, until the last century was performed only by man, horse or waterpower, so that production was slow and small. These old methods could not meet the greatly increased demand that then arose for wire of all kinds, such as copper wire for electrical purposes, and consequently powerdriven multidie benches were developed. Drawing speeds were still limited to several hundreds of feet per minute because of the rapid wear of the chilled iron and steel dies then used but with the introduction of tungsten carbide dies and diamond dies, speeds were again increased, and now figures of 2,000 ft. per minute for steel wire, and 5,000 ft. per minute or more for copper and aluminium, are commonplace. These advances have required improved drawing lubricants, and future increases in drawing speeds likewise largely depend on improving lubricants still further. The general problem is to provide adequate lubrication for long die life, coupled with the intensive cooling that higher drawing speeds compel. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Lubricants for Wiredrawing

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, Volume 7 (5): 5 – May 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052335
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The PROCESS OF MAKING WIRE by drawing operations through dies, as distinct from hammering, though believed to be several thousand years old, until the last century was performed only by man, horse or waterpower, so that production was slow and small. These old methods could not meet the greatly increased demand that then arose for wire of all kinds, such as copper wire for electrical purposes, and consequently powerdriven multidie benches were developed. Drawing speeds were still limited to several hundreds of feet per minute because of the rapid wear of the chilled iron and steel dies then used but with the introduction of tungsten carbide dies and diamond dies, speeds were again increased, and now figures of 2,000 ft. per minute for steel wire, and 5,000 ft. per minute or more for copper and aluminium, are commonplace. These advances have required improved drawing lubricants, and future increases in drawing speeds likewise largely depend on improving lubricants still further. The general problem is to provide adequate lubrication for long die life, coupled with the intensive cooling that higher drawing speeds compel.

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1955

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