Lowest drag ever on debris‐guarded temperature sensor using computational fluid dynamics

Lowest drag ever on debris‐guarded temperature sensor using computational fluid dynamics BFGoodrich Aerospace Aircraft Sensors Division engineers achieved their best ever level of aerodynamic performance on a temperature sensor with a debris guard by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to optimize the design prior to prototyping. Meeting the conflicting needs of protecting the sensing element from debris and achieving the desired level of sensor accuracy and performance made this a very complex problem. CFD allowed engineers to evaluate the performance of 20 different design alternatives within the six‐month lead time for the project. This made it possible to substantially reduce drag relative to current designs while meeting all accuracy and durability requirements. The traditional build‐and‐test method is so much more costly and time‐consuming than CFD that it would have been impossible to evaluate anywhere near this number of alternatives using this approach. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Lowest drag ever on debris‐guarded temperature sensor using computational fluid dynamics

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/00022669810202363
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BFGoodrich Aerospace Aircraft Sensors Division engineers achieved their best ever level of aerodynamic performance on a temperature sensor with a debris guard by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to optimize the design prior to prototyping. Meeting the conflicting needs of protecting the sensing element from debris and achieving the desired level of sensor accuracy and performance made this a very complex problem. CFD allowed engineers to evaluate the performance of 20 different design alternatives within the six‐month lead time for the project. This made it possible to substantially reduce drag relative to current designs while meeting all accuracy and durability requirements. The traditional build‐and‐test method is so much more costly and time‐consuming than CFD that it would have been impossible to evaluate anywhere near this number of alternatives using this approach.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1998

Keywords: Aerodynamics; Computer simulation; Fluid dynamics; Sensors

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