Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Lost and found: an exploration of the professional identity of primary teachers during the Covid-19 pandemic

Lost and found: an exploration of the professional identity of primary teachers during the... The purpose of this paper is to report on a small-scale study to explore the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on Irish primary teachers’ evolving identities.Design/methodology/approachUsing a narrative methodological approach, the study was underpinned by Kelchtermans’ (2009) interpretive framework. Five Irish primary teachers participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. The teachers’ narratives focused on what it meant to “be” a teacher during the pandemic, their overall experience of teaching and learning, their motivation during (and beyond) this time, lessons learned and their future perspectives.FindingsThe paper found that teachers’ identities shifted and evolved over the course of the pandemic, as they initially struggled to make sense of the significant challenges. However, the emergent self-image, as illustrated here, is characterised by commitment, altruistic motivation and personal and professional growth. The study also demonstrated a reconstruction of teachers’ identities, in line with reconfigured relationships with parents, a renewed commitment to space and time in teaching and learning and an attendance to pupil voice.Originality/valueThere is little specific research on how teachers’ identities have been redefined over the course of the pandemic. This admittedly small-scale study offers insights on how teachers viewed themselves during the pandemic, what it means to be a teacher at this tumultuous time and gives voice to the hard-learned lessons they take with them into a post-Covid era. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Multicultural Education Emerald Publishing

Lost and found: an exploration of the professional identity of primary teachers during the Covid-19 pandemic

Journal for Multicultural Education , Volume 16 (1): 13 – Mar 21, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/lost-and-found-an-exploration-of-the-professional-identity-of-primary-wf1yaDlr7A
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2053-535X
DOI
10.1108/jme-08-2021-0158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to report on a small-scale study to explore the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on Irish primary teachers’ evolving identities.Design/methodology/approachUsing a narrative methodological approach, the study was underpinned by Kelchtermans’ (2009) interpretive framework. Five Irish primary teachers participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. The teachers’ narratives focused on what it meant to “be” a teacher during the pandemic, their overall experience of teaching and learning, their motivation during (and beyond) this time, lessons learned and their future perspectives.FindingsThe paper found that teachers’ identities shifted and evolved over the course of the pandemic, as they initially struggled to make sense of the significant challenges. However, the emergent self-image, as illustrated here, is characterised by commitment, altruistic motivation and personal and professional growth. The study also demonstrated a reconstruction of teachers’ identities, in line with reconfigured relationships with parents, a renewed commitment to space and time in teaching and learning and an attendance to pupil voice.Originality/valueThere is little specific research on how teachers’ identities have been redefined over the course of the pandemic. This admittedly small-scale study offers insights on how teachers viewed themselves during the pandemic, what it means to be a teacher at this tumultuous time and gives voice to the hard-learned lessons they take with them into a post-Covid era.

Journal

Journal for Multicultural EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 21, 2022

Keywords: Identity; Teachers; Pandemic; Covid-19

References