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“Lost and altered consciousness” – a headache for many

“Lost and altered consciousness” – a headache for many Purpose – This is the second instalment of a two‐part paper that aims to consider the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and to analyse how this benefit applies to claimants who are unable to work because they experience episodes of lost or altered consciousness. Design/methodology/approach – In the first part of the paper, which featured in Social Care and Neurodisability , Vol. 2 No. 1, the authors considered the legal meaning of lost or altered consciousness and explained how the IB/ESA appraisal and appeals system operates. This second instalment gives practical guidance to advisers who are assisting their clients in applying for ESA and appealing negative decisions to the tribunal (given its ever increasing importance, this paper focuses on ESA; however, the same considerations apply to IB cases). Findings – The paper highlights the complexities and limitations of the benefit system for those suffering with lost and altered consciousness. Practical implications – Advisers need to think laterally when assisting their clients. Originality/value – The paper should provide a useful reference point for advisers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Care and Neurodisability Emerald Publishing

“Lost and altered consciousness” – a headache for many

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0919
DOI
10.1108/20420911111172747
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This is the second instalment of a two‐part paper that aims to consider the assessment criteria for incapacity benefit (IB) and employment and support allowance (ESA) and to analyse how this benefit applies to claimants who are unable to work because they experience episodes of lost or altered consciousness. Design/methodology/approach – In the first part of the paper, which featured in Social Care and Neurodisability , Vol. 2 No. 1, the authors considered the legal meaning of lost or altered consciousness and explained how the IB/ESA appraisal and appeals system operates. This second instalment gives practical guidance to advisers who are assisting their clients in applying for ESA and appealing negative decisions to the tribunal (given its ever increasing importance, this paper focuses on ESA; however, the same considerations apply to IB cases). Findings – The paper highlights the complexities and limitations of the benefit system for those suffering with lost and altered consciousness. Practical implications – Advisers need to think laterally when assisting their clients. Originality/value – The paper should provide a useful reference point for advisers.

Journal

Social Care and NeurodisabilityEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 15, 2011

Keywords: Lost or altered consciousness; Employment and support allowance; Benefits; Legal advice; Appeals

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