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Local responses to disasters: recent lessons from zero-order responders

Local responses to disasters: recent lessons from zero-order responders The purpose of this paper is to define and discuss the concept of zero-order responders (ZOR). It explores the potential lessons and the additive value that assimilation of responses of disaster-affected people into disaster risk reduction (DRR) and disaster risk management (DRM) programs can provide.Design/methodology/approachIn order to support this concept, the authors review two recent extreme hydrometeorological events, illustrating how local populations cope with disasters during the period before external support arrives. Additionally, the authors address their under-leveraged role in the management of recovery. The empirical evidence was collected by direct observations during the 2017 El Niño Costero-related floods in Peru, and by the review of press following 2017 hurricanes Irma and Maria destruction in Puerto Rico.FindingsDuring disasters, there is a window of time before official and/or external support arrives. During this period, citizens must act unsupported by first responders – devising self-coping strategies in order to survive. In the days, weeks and months following a disaster, local populations are still facing recovery with creativity.Research limitations/implicationsCiting references arguing for or against the value of documenting survivor methods to serve as a testimony for the improvement of DRR programming.Practical implicationsDRR and DRM must integrate local populations and knowledge into DRR planning to improve partnerships between communities and organizations.Social implicationsThe actions and experiences of citizens pro-acting to pave fruitful futures is a valuable commentary on improvements for DRR and management.Originality/valueThis paper proposes a citizen-centered contribution to future disaster risk reducing actions. This approach emphasizes the reinterpretation of local responses to disasters. DRRs and DRMs growth as fields would value from heralding ZOR coping and improvisation skills, illustrated under stressful disaster-related conditions, as an additive resource to programming development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disaster Prevention and Management Emerald Publishing

Local responses to disasters: recent lessons from zero-order responders

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References (18)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0965-3562
DOI
10.1108/dpm-05-2018-0151
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to define and discuss the concept of zero-order responders (ZOR). It explores the potential lessons and the additive value that assimilation of responses of disaster-affected people into disaster risk reduction (DRR) and disaster risk management (DRM) programs can provide.Design/methodology/approachIn order to support this concept, the authors review two recent extreme hydrometeorological events, illustrating how local populations cope with disasters during the period before external support arrives. Additionally, the authors address their under-leveraged role in the management of recovery. The empirical evidence was collected by direct observations during the 2017 El Niño Costero-related floods in Peru, and by the review of press following 2017 hurricanes Irma and Maria destruction in Puerto Rico.FindingsDuring disasters, there is a window of time before official and/or external support arrives. During this period, citizens must act unsupported by first responders – devising self-coping strategies in order to survive. In the days, weeks and months following a disaster, local populations are still facing recovery with creativity.Research limitations/implicationsCiting references arguing for or against the value of documenting survivor methods to serve as a testimony for the improvement of DRR programming.Practical implicationsDRR and DRM must integrate local populations and knowledge into DRR planning to improve partnerships between communities and organizations.Social implicationsThe actions and experiences of citizens pro-acting to pave fruitful futures is a valuable commentary on improvements for DRR and management.Originality/valueThis paper proposes a citizen-centered contribution to future disaster risk reducing actions. This approach emphasizes the reinterpretation of local responses to disasters. DRRs and DRMs growth as fields would value from heralding ZOR coping and improvisation skills, illustrated under stressful disaster-related conditions, as an additive resource to programming development.

Journal

Disaster Prevention and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 22, 2019

Keywords: Disaster risk management; Disaster risk reduction; Survivors; Improvisation; Victims; Local disasters responses

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