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Linking leaders’ beliefs to their behaviors and competencies

Linking leaders’ beliefs to their behaviors and competencies Discusses how competency models are used with the intent to improve managers' leadership skills. Determines that competency models will not result in any substantive changes in behaviors because they fail to address managers' fundamental beliefs about the practice of business. A new construct is presented for conventional management practice that shows how leader's beliefs lead to behaviors, which, in turn, lead to competencies that most managers would find undesirable. The beliefs, behaviors, and competencies of leaders skilled in the lean management system are presented in contrast and shown to be remarkably different from that possessed by managers skilled in conventional management practices. The results illustrate important limitations of leadership competency models. The development of new leadership competencies is re-framed as a change-over problem. Coupled with kaizen, competencies that better serve the interests of a business and its key stakeholders can be more effectively realized. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Decision Emerald Publishing

Linking leaders’ beliefs to their behaviors and competencies

Management Decision , Volume 41 (9): 18 – Nov 1, 2003

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References (49)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0025-1747
DOI
10.1108/00251740310497430
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Discusses how competency models are used with the intent to improve managers' leadership skills. Determines that competency models will not result in any substantive changes in behaviors because they fail to address managers' fundamental beliefs about the practice of business. A new construct is presented for conventional management practice that shows how leader's beliefs lead to behaviors, which, in turn, lead to competencies that most managers would find undesirable. The beliefs, behaviors, and competencies of leaders skilled in the lean management system are presented in contrast and shown to be remarkably different from that possessed by managers skilled in conventional management practices. The results illustrate important limitations of leadership competency models. The development of new leadership competencies is re-framed as a change-over problem. Coupled with kaizen, competencies that better serve the interests of a business and its key stakeholders can be more effectively realized.

Journal

Management DecisionEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 2003

Keywords: Beliefs; Behaviour; Competences; Leadership; Management styles

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