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Linking business level strategy with activities and knowledge resources

Linking business level strategy with activities and knowledge resources Increasingly, managers are becoming aware of the importance of knowledge resources in pursuing international business strategy. Knowledge provides the capability to identify, examine and capture market opportunities. It develops competence in important activities and helps resolve problems. Knowledge is also changing the way firms compete, particularly in international business where opportunities to create value are shifting from managing tangible assets to managing knowledge‐based strategies. This shifting competitive landscape is being driven by the speed of competition. Firms require a framework for managing knowledge resources in dynamic and rapidly changing market conditions. This article uses a case study approach to examine knowledge management for an Australian firm with operations throughout Asia. Based on depth interviews with the firm’s 20 most senior executives, we developed a knowledge management strategy for the firm’s international business operations that aimed to address these issues. Our model explains a process for managing knowledge in order to achieve a quantum change in international business strategy. This is particularly important in international business as firms’ recognize the need for different strategic approaches in overseas markets. Our model extends Kaplan and Norton’s concept of strategic themes to incorporate the strategic management imperative of value creating activities. In doing so, it provides a way to link strategy and knowledge resources in order to achieve significant strategic change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Knowledge Management Emerald Publishing

Linking business level strategy with activities and knowledge resources

Journal of Knowledge Management , Volume 8 (6): 13 – Dec 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1367-3270
DOI
10.1108/13673270410567620
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increasingly, managers are becoming aware of the importance of knowledge resources in pursuing international business strategy. Knowledge provides the capability to identify, examine and capture market opportunities. It develops competence in important activities and helps resolve problems. Knowledge is also changing the way firms compete, particularly in international business where opportunities to create value are shifting from managing tangible assets to managing knowledge‐based strategies. This shifting competitive landscape is being driven by the speed of competition. Firms require a framework for managing knowledge resources in dynamic and rapidly changing market conditions. This article uses a case study approach to examine knowledge management for an Australian firm with operations throughout Asia. Based on depth interviews with the firm’s 20 most senior executives, we developed a knowledge management strategy for the firm’s international business operations that aimed to address these issues. Our model explains a process for managing knowledge in order to achieve a quantum change in international business strategy. This is particularly important in international business as firms’ recognize the need for different strategic approaches in overseas markets. Our model extends Kaplan and Norton’s concept of strategic themes to incorporate the strategic management imperative of value creating activities. In doing so, it provides a way to link strategy and knowledge resources in order to achieve significant strategic change.

Journal

Journal of Knowledge ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2004

Keywords: Corporate strategy; Knowledge management; International business

References