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Library Education and Manufactured Fiscal Crises

Library Education and Manufactured Fiscal Crises Editorial Library Education and Manufactured Fiscal Crises Recent times have not been good analysis of the closings. They should of Library Service with courses re­ times for library education. The lat­ send strong signals to library schools quired in that concentration taught est Bowker Annual lists only 54 ac­ primarily by adjunct faculty. In hind­ that want to stay in the business of credite d programs in the United education. sight, it is apparent that the faculty States, down from 63 at the begin­ The first is the dissertation that of the library school and the provost ning of the 1980s. We are left with shared a different reality. Marion Paris completed at Indiana a shrinking group as we enter the University more than four years ago. At this point it is important for us ne w decade. In looking for a pattern of predis­ to try to understand the fragile link The schools that met their demise posing factors in the closings, she between the university and profes­ were puzzlingly disparate. They in­ found that "although they were os­ sional schools of librarianship. Un­ cluded not only Geneseo, Denver, tensibly fiscally motivated, budget­ like law or medicine our graduates Peabody, and Ball State but also Case ary concerns were only the impetus are not heavy financial contributors. Western, the University of Southern that set the decision making process Unlike business schools, we do not California, the University of Minne­ in motion which led to their have courses that attract students sota, and Emory, with admissions elimination." from a cross section of university suspended at the University of Chi­ ALA accreditation alone could not disciplines. And, equally important, cago. In the latest report of the elite guarantee longevity. In fact, a re­ in the less than perfect life of the schools of library education, pro­ view of past history gives evidence university, we produce graduates grams at Case Western and Chicago that it was accredited programs that who populate a woman's profession. wer e perceived by educators faltered, though conditionally ac­ Given these conditions and isolation throughout the country as among the credited programs were allowed to from the mainstream of university life, top 15 places to educate librarians. stand and become revitalized. library education is placed on a tra­ (Jean-Pierre Herubel, College and jectory that, too frequently in the The most important underlying Research Libraries, (May 1990) pp. pattern appears to be the lack of fac­ past, has led to closings. 398-401.) ulty visibility in the life of the uni­ We agree with Bob Wedgeworth's In 1990 as enrollments were hit­ gallant letter to the chair of the versities that sponsored the failed ting a new peak, we were beginning programs and their tendency to re­ Trustees of Columbia University on to breath easy again and believe that main isolated from the mainstream the day of their decision to leave li­ the worst was over. That was before brary education, ". . .there is no fu­ of intellectual and social life. ture for a program at a university the news that Columbia was in jeop­ In the most recent crisis in library ardy. The oldest and one of the best that is either hostile or indifferent to education, the demise of the flagship schools in the history of the profes­ its interests." We share his hopes for program in library education at Co­ a blue ribbon committee to review sion was being sacrificed for what its lumbia, there is a similar ring to the parent University termed budgetary the circumstances under which the report of Columbia University Prov­ exigencies. Shivers of concern swept action was taken, not only to protect ost Jonathan R. Cole on the School the integrity of the School at Colum­ over us anew as we contemplated of Library Service. the growing demand for librarians bia but also to prevent misguided The school is applauded for its and the decreasing number of schools actions that may be proposed for place in the history of librarianship; other programs in other universities for them to turn to for a quality ed­ but it, too, is termed "isolated within ucation. The priority of library ed­ based on the events in New York. the University." The report pro­ ucation on universities' funding lists nounces, "Instructional programs If the fate of Columbia is termi­ has dropped alarmingly. offer few opportunities for ex­ nation as the result of a manufac­ While The Bottom Line continues change with students in other schools tured fiscal crisis, library education to stress the importance of strong in the University. Links between the is in trouble everywhere. financial management in our insti­ School and the University libraries tutions, it is also important to distin­ and Computer Center are not as guish between actions that result strong as they could be. There is a from real fiscal crises and those that failure to connect to scholarly works result from expediently manufac­ of other faculty." All of which is tured fiscal crises. Are library pro­ characterize d as diminishing the grams being impaled because of a school's contribution to Columbia. diminished revenue base? The provost goes on to charge that Two treatises from widely differ­ information science, a field with ent sources, but with remarkably promise for intellectual growth, has similar conclusions, provide the best virtually no presence in the School Volume 4, Number 2 THE BOTTOM LINE 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances Emerald Publishing

Library Education and Manufactured Fiscal Crises

The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances , Volume 4 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1991

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Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0888-045X
DOI
10.1108/eb025275
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Abstract

Editorial Library Education and Manufactured Fiscal Crises Recent times have not been good analysis of the closings. They should of Library Service with courses re­ times for library education. The lat­ send strong signals to library schools quired in that concentration taught est Bowker Annual lists only 54 ac­ primarily by adjunct faculty. In hind­ that want to stay in the business of credite d programs in the United education. sight, it is apparent that the faculty States, down from 63 at the begin­ The first is the dissertation that of the library school and the provost ning of the 1980s. We are left with shared a different reality. Marion Paris completed at Indiana a shrinking group as we enter the University more than four years ago. At this point it is important for us ne w decade. In looking for a pattern of predis­ to try to understand the fragile link The schools that met their demise posing factors in the closings, she between the university and profes­ were puzzlingly disparate. They in­ found that "although they were os­ sional schools of librarianship. Un­ cluded not only Geneseo, Denver, tensibly fiscally motivated, budget­ like law or medicine our graduates Peabody, and Ball State but also Case ary concerns were only the impetus are not heavy financial contributors. Western, the University of Southern that set the decision making process Unlike business schools, we do not California, the University of Minne­ in motion which led to their have courses that attract students sota, and Emory, with admissions elimination." from a cross section of university suspended at the University of Chi­ ALA accreditation alone could not disciplines. And, equally important, cago. In the latest report of the elite guarantee longevity. In fact, a re­ in the less than perfect life of the schools of library education, pro­ view of past history gives evidence university, we produce graduates grams at Case Western and Chicago that it was accredited programs that who populate a woman's profession. wer e perceived by educators faltered, though conditionally ac­ Given these conditions and isolation throughout the country as among the credited programs were allowed to from the mainstream of university life, top 15 places to educate librarians. stand and become revitalized. library education is placed on a tra­ (Jean-Pierre Herubel, College and jectory that, too frequently in the The most important underlying Research Libraries, (May 1990) pp. pattern appears to be the lack of fac­ past, has led to closings. 398-401.) ulty visibility in the life of the uni­ We agree with Bob Wedgeworth's In 1990 as enrollments were hit­ gallant letter to the chair of the versities that sponsored the failed ting a new peak, we were beginning programs and their tendency to re­ Trustees of Columbia University on to breath easy again and believe that main isolated from the mainstream the day of their decision to leave li­ the worst was over. That was before brary education, ". . .there is no fu­ of intellectual and social life. ture for a program at a university the news that Columbia was in jeop­ In the most recent crisis in library ardy. The oldest and one of the best that is either hostile or indifferent to education, the demise of the flagship schools in the history of the profes­ its interests." We share his hopes for program in library education at Co­ a blue ribbon committee to review sion was being sacrificed for what its lumbia, there is a similar ring to the parent University termed budgetary the circumstances under which the report of Columbia University Prov­ exigencies. Shivers of concern swept action was taken, not only to protect ost Jonathan R. Cole on the School the integrity of the School at Colum­ over us anew as we contemplated of Library Service. the growing demand for librarians bia but also to prevent misguided The school is applauded for its and the decreasing number of schools actions that may be proposed for place in the history of librarianship; other programs in other universities for them to turn to for a quality ed­ but it, too, is termed "isolated within ucation. The priority of library ed­ based on the events in New York. the University." The report pro­ ucation on universities' funding lists nounces, "Instructional programs If the fate of Columbia is termi­ has dropped alarmingly. offer few opportunities for ex­ nation as the result of a manufac­ While The Bottom Line continues change with students in other schools tured fiscal crisis, library education to stress the importance of strong in the University. Links between the is in trouble everywhere. financial management in our insti­ School and the University libraries tutions, it is also important to distin­ and Computer Center are not as guish between actions that result strong as they could be. There is a from real fiscal crises and those that failure to connect to scholarly works result from expediently manufac­ of other faculty." All of which is tured fiscal crises. Are library pro­ characterize d as diminishing the grams being impaled because of a school's contribution to Columbia. diminished revenue base? The provost goes on to charge that Two treatises from widely differ­ information science, a field with ent sources, but with remarkably promise for intellectual growth, has similar conclusions, provide the best virtually no presence in the School Volume 4, Number 2 THE BOTTOM LINE 3

Journal

The Bottom Line: Managing Library FinancesEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1991

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