Leaving the cocoon: university course design and delivery vis-a-vis competitive strategy

Leaving the cocoon: university course design and delivery vis-a-vis competitive strategy Purpose – This article aims to ask how Michael Porter’s seminal notions of generic competitive strategy may be applied to an emerging university industry where course design and delivery is conceived of as able to be undertaken using distinctive modes. Design/methodology/approach – The study is principally a polemic piece. However, its method is to view course delivery modes as generic strategies and overlay these on Porter’s strategy grid. Each mode of course delivery is viewed as a strategy because it is associated with a rationale that can be reconciled with the axes of advantage that Porter has defined. These axes are “kind of benefit” and “target market”. Findings – The study finds four generic methods of tertiary course delivery. These can be placed – largely without ambiguity – on Porter’s grid. Research limitations/implications – Further research may recreate findings using methods that draw on more data; possibly, survey evidence or multiple interviews, etc. Practical implications – The work has implications for university administrators and strategic planners within the tertiary sector. It connects sector-specific planning with theory and research about Porter’s generic strategies. Social implications – The article has public policy implications. It offers a portrait of how public-sector education is likely to look in a deregulated context. It offers implicit advice of securing competitive advantage for individual institutions. Originality/value – The article undertakes an exercise that has not been done before. The theory used for interpretation purposes is likely to be unfamiliar to those interested in planning within the tertiary sector (particularly, the public sector), although care is taken to justify new application of the theory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png On the Horizon Emerald Publishing

Leaving the cocoon: university course design and delivery vis-a-vis competitive strategy

On the Horizon, Volume 23 (1): 11 – Feb 9, 2015

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1074-8121
DOI
10.1108/OTH-10-2014-0034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This article aims to ask how Michael Porter’s seminal notions of generic competitive strategy may be applied to an emerging university industry where course design and delivery is conceived of as able to be undertaken using distinctive modes. Design/methodology/approach – The study is principally a polemic piece. However, its method is to view course delivery modes as generic strategies and overlay these on Porter’s strategy grid. Each mode of course delivery is viewed as a strategy because it is associated with a rationale that can be reconciled with the axes of advantage that Porter has defined. These axes are “kind of benefit” and “target market”. Findings – The study finds four generic methods of tertiary course delivery. These can be placed – largely without ambiguity – on Porter’s grid. Research limitations/implications – Further research may recreate findings using methods that draw on more data; possibly, survey evidence or multiple interviews, etc. Practical implications – The work has implications for university administrators and strategic planners within the tertiary sector. It connects sector-specific planning with theory and research about Porter’s generic strategies. Social implications – The article has public policy implications. It offers a portrait of how public-sector education is likely to look in a deregulated context. It offers implicit advice of securing competitive advantage for individual institutions. Originality/value – The article undertakes an exercise that has not been done before. The theory used for interpretation purposes is likely to be unfamiliar to those interested in planning within the tertiary sector (particularly, the public sector), although care is taken to justify new application of the theory.

Journal

On the HorizonEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 9, 2015

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