Learning to talk: from manual work to discourse work as self‐regulating practice

Learning to talk: from manual work to discourse work as self‐regulating practice In the new work order, more and more work is talk, and much of the new kinds of textual or discourse work that employees, including production line workers, are undertaking, is enacted during team meetings. Learning to be a team member involves learning to talk. This paper presents ethnographic and discourse data from a large, Australian manufacturing workplace to argue that central to the participatory practices of working in teams is the development of discursive networks of participation, constructed to elicit "bottom up" engagement with work-related problems and issues, and produce offers of worker involvement, rather than relying on more traditional, "top down" management commands and control of workplace knowledge. In the case presented here, the team members are production line workers from different areas of the workplace and thus they hold, and (can) contribute, different kinds of knowledge to the team meetings. The developing discourses of offers and suggestions for improvements can be seen as producing self-regulating (organisational) workers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Workplace Learning Emerald Publishing

Learning to talk: from manual work to discourse work as self‐regulating practice

Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 15 (7/8): 6 – Dec 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/learning-to-talk-from-manual-work-to-discourse-work-as-self-regulating-zF40GCjTiu
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1366-5626
DOI
10.1108/13665620310504819
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the new work order, more and more work is talk, and much of the new kinds of textual or discourse work that employees, including production line workers, are undertaking, is enacted during team meetings. Learning to be a team member involves learning to talk. This paper presents ethnographic and discourse data from a large, Australian manufacturing workplace to argue that central to the participatory practices of working in teams is the development of discursive networks of participation, constructed to elicit "bottom up" engagement with work-related problems and issues, and produce offers of worker involvement, rather than relying on more traditional, "top down" management commands and control of workplace knowledge. In the case presented here, the team members are production line workers from different areas of the workplace and thus they hold, and (can) contribute, different kinds of knowledge to the team meetings. The developing discourses of offers and suggestions for improvements can be seen as producing self-regulating (organisational) workers.

Journal

Journal of Workplace LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2003

Keywords: Workplace; Teams; Knowledge production; Identity

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month