Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Leadership Development: Applying New Learning in an Organisational Context

Leadership Development: Applying New Learning in an Organisational Context This paper presents findings from a qualitative study evaluating the impact of a leadership development intervention. The evaluation was designed to look beyond individual learning, but explore organisational learning once participants rejoined their organisations. A range of interviews were conducted with participants and their line managers to elicit perceptions about what participants learned, how interviewees thought the learning was used in practice and what organisational procedures are in place to integrate new learning into work practices within the organisation. The evaluation shows that individual learning took place, but little organisational learning transpired. The research found that lack of time to practice new learning and fragmented organisational support are the factors that influence learning transfer. Additional factors influencing the identification of learning transfer are the non‐alignment of organisational strategy/need with the education agenda supporting this strategy/need and the limited understanding of measurable benefits ‐ financial or behavioural ‐ that such training may provide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services Emerald Publishing

Leadership Development: Applying New Learning in an Organisational Context

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/leadership-development-applying-new-learning-in-an-organisational-FB1p6Q9MU2
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1747-9886
DOI
10.1108/17479886200600018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a qualitative study evaluating the impact of a leadership development intervention. The evaluation was designed to look beyond individual learning, but explore organisational learning once participants rejoined their organisations. A range of interviews were conducted with participants and their line managers to elicit perceptions about what participants learned, how interviewees thought the learning was used in practice and what organisational procedures are in place to integrate new learning into work practices within the organisation. The evaluation shows that individual learning took place, but little organisational learning transpired. The research found that lack of time to practice new learning and fragmented organisational support are the factors that influence learning transfer. Additional factors influencing the identification of learning transfer are the non‐alignment of organisational strategy/need with the education agenda supporting this strategy/need and the limited understanding of measurable benefits ‐ financial or behavioural ‐ that such training may provide.

Journal

The International Journal of Leadership in Public ServicesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2006

Keywords: Individual learning; Leadership development intervention; New learning; Organisational learning; Training outcomes

There are no references for this article.