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Knowledge-sharing mechanisms: human resource practices and trust

Knowledge-sharing mechanisms: human resource practices and trust This study sought to examine the detailed mechanism of employee perceptions of commitment-based human resource practices (CBHRPs) to employee knowledge-sharing behavior (i.e. knowledge collection and knowledge contribution) by unveiling the “black box” of trust in the workplace.Design/methodology/approachBased on data from 383 employees in China's Top Innovators in 2016, path analysis was used to test six hypotheses.FindingsEmployee perceptions of CBHRPs, namely, selection, incentives and training and development, were positively related to employees' trust in coworkers, supervisors and the organization, which in turn was positively related to employees' knowledge collection and contribution behavior. Trust in the workplace fully mediated the relationship between employee perceptions of CBHRPs and employee knowledge sharing. Among CBHRPs, training and development practices had the strongest effects on employees' knowledge-sharing behavior. Among trust, trust in coworkers was found to be the closest related to knowledge-sharing behavior. Knowledge contribution was more related to CBHRPs through trust than knowledge collection was.Practical implicationsOrganizations can employ CBHRPs to enhance trust in the workplace and encourage employees to contribute toward and collect knowledge. Organizations need to pay more attention to employees' long-term investment, such as employee training and development. Organizations can perform human resource practices consistently and ensure that all employees are aware of practices in use to enhance employees' understanding of these practices.Originality/valueThis study provides a detailed understanding of the relationship between human resource management and knowledge sharing. It also presents new empirical evidence in the research fields of human resource management and knowledge management, with implications for the development of employees' knowledge-sharing behavior. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance Emerald Publishing

Knowledge-sharing mechanisms: human resource practices and trust

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2051-6614
DOI
10.1108/joepp-12-2019-0114
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study sought to examine the detailed mechanism of employee perceptions of commitment-based human resource practices (CBHRPs) to employee knowledge-sharing behavior (i.e. knowledge collection and knowledge contribution) by unveiling the “black box” of trust in the workplace.Design/methodology/approachBased on data from 383 employees in China's Top Innovators in 2016, path analysis was used to test six hypotheses.FindingsEmployee perceptions of CBHRPs, namely, selection, incentives and training and development, were positively related to employees' trust in coworkers, supervisors and the organization, which in turn was positively related to employees' knowledge collection and contribution behavior. Trust in the workplace fully mediated the relationship between employee perceptions of CBHRPs and employee knowledge sharing. Among CBHRPs, training and development practices had the strongest effects on employees' knowledge-sharing behavior. Among trust, trust in coworkers was found to be the closest related to knowledge-sharing behavior. Knowledge contribution was more related to CBHRPs through trust than knowledge collection was.Practical implicationsOrganizations can employ CBHRPs to enhance trust in the workplace and encourage employees to contribute toward and collect knowledge. Organizations need to pay more attention to employees' long-term investment, such as employee training and development. Organizations can perform human resource practices consistently and ensure that all employees are aware of practices in use to enhance employees' understanding of these practices.Originality/valueThis study provides a detailed understanding of the relationship between human resource management and knowledge sharing. It also presents new empirical evidence in the research fields of human resource management and knowledge management, with implications for the development of employees' knowledge-sharing behavior.

Journal

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and PerformanceEmerald Publishing

Published: May 7, 2021

Keywords: Commitment-based human resource practices; Knowledge collection; Knowledge contribution; Knowledge sharing; Trust

References