Knowledge sharing in large IT organizations: a case study

Knowledge sharing in large IT organizations: a case study Purpose – Research has shown that the current knowledge management (KM) practices are developed from the standpoint of the management and do not put enough emphasis on knowledge sharing from the non‐executive employees' perspective. However, it is important for organizations to understand – from the perspective of employees – the factors that motivate employees to share knowledge for successful implementation of any KM program. In this exploratory study, willingness of employees to share knowledge is the dependent variable. The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge sharing factors from the employees' perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Using survey methodology, two large IT service and consulting organizations were included in the study to examine cultural, technological, motivational and organizational factors, which influence knowledge sharing within an organization from the perspective of non‐executive employees. Findings – The study results showed that issues related to availability and usability of technology, leadership support and motivating structures were shown to have influences on knowledge sharing. The study also revealed that employees' willingness to share knowledge was not affected by their concerns about the loss of power or job insecurity. Research limitations/implications – Self‐reporting bias is a limitation of the survey study. Self‐report bias occurs when individuals would bring in their experiences, self‐perception, and their work environment when completing a survey. Even though the present study clearly indicates to the participants that it is anonymous, it is possible that sometimes participants may misreport and misrepresent their perceptions to make themselves look better. The study was exploratory, and it was limited to two organizations. This would therefore restrict one from generalizing the outcomes of the study. Originality/value – This exploratory study contributed to a deeper understanding of knowledge sharing with empirical data from two large IT organizations based on the non‐executive employees' perspective rather than that of management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png VINE Emerald Publishing

Knowledge sharing in large IT organizations: a case study

VINE, Volume 37 (4): 19 – Oct 30, 2007

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0305-5728
DOI
10.1108/03055720710838506
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Research has shown that the current knowledge management (KM) practices are developed from the standpoint of the management and do not put enough emphasis on knowledge sharing from the non‐executive employees' perspective. However, it is important for organizations to understand – from the perspective of employees – the factors that motivate employees to share knowledge for successful implementation of any KM program. In this exploratory study, willingness of employees to share knowledge is the dependent variable. The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge sharing factors from the employees' perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Using survey methodology, two large IT service and consulting organizations were included in the study to examine cultural, technological, motivational and organizational factors, which influence knowledge sharing within an organization from the perspective of non‐executive employees. Findings – The study results showed that issues related to availability and usability of technology, leadership support and motivating structures were shown to have influences on knowledge sharing. The study also revealed that employees' willingness to share knowledge was not affected by their concerns about the loss of power or job insecurity. Research limitations/implications – Self‐reporting bias is a limitation of the survey study. Self‐report bias occurs when individuals would bring in their experiences, self‐perception, and their work environment when completing a survey. Even though the present study clearly indicates to the participants that it is anonymous, it is possible that sometimes participants may misreport and misrepresent their perceptions to make themselves look better. The study was exploratory, and it was limited to two organizations. This would therefore restrict one from generalizing the outcomes of the study. Originality/value – This exploratory study contributed to a deeper understanding of knowledge sharing with empirical data from two large IT organizations based on the non‐executive employees' perspective rather than that of management.

Journal

VINEEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 30, 2007

Keywords: Knowledge sharing; Large enterprises

References

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