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K.M. Alloy Blanking and Press Bend Tools

K.M. Alloy Blanking and Press Bend Tools MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUE K.M. Alloy Blanking and Press Bend Tools The press bend tool shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 Press Bend Tools is a similar development to that already described. Again standard alloy bolsters are adopted—in this case there are two for the die—since these Particulars of the Experiences of Percival Aircraft Ltd., of Luton, in tools are primarily intended for forming standard the use of Alloy Tools in the Production of Detail Parts bends. The only work necessary on the bolster is the drilling and tapping of the two holes for the Percival Aircraft Ltd. have recently adopted a pressure pad screws and the machining of the most interesting sytem for the economical manu­ faces. The pressure pad too is cast in K.M. Alloy facture of small part press tools. The' material and machined. used is the K.M. Alloy low melting-point alloy Even in cases where a special, non-standard and by its use the tool room work on punches bend is required, the cost of these cast parts is far and dies has been drastically cut. The method is below that of the usual steel tool. not entirely original, but it is still comparatively Both the blanking and press bend tools effect little used. a great saving in tool cost, both because of the case of manufacture and in the cheaper (and re­ usable) materials. Further, when a modification Blanking Tools is introduced, the alteration of the pattern and The Percival design for blanking tools consists re-casting of the dies is a simple matter—this in of two sizes of standard bolster (FIG. 1) cast from turn prevents a lingering retention of some un­ the alloy and machined only on the top and suitable part because of the expense of changing bottom faces. The smaller bolster is suitable for it. part sup to 3 in. x 4 in., while the larger accom­ modates details as large as 3¾ in. X 8½ in. A standard punch plate, to be retained in the ture of the bolster is made so that machining, for press, has also been designed with a tee-slot and which due allowances are made, need only be on a standard set of holes for locating Allen screws the top and bottom faces. An allowance of 0.020 —0,030 in. undersize on the component profile is and Tee nuts. The holes in the punch plate are allowed so that the die can be cleaned out to size drilled from a Master Drill Plate in order to ensure that all punch plates will be interchange­ by pressing the punch through it. A clearance of able. This Master Drill Plate is, of course, again it in. on the profile is allowed all round to within used by the toolmaker when making the punches. 1/ in. of the top of the die. The punch itself is made from ⅜ in. thick mould An important improvement over earlier alloy blanking tools is the use of this clearance steel. After the punch has been made it is mounted so that the part falls away, instead of having to on the plate, or if it has a profile less than ½ in. wide, it is mounted on a small cast holder that is be lifted out of the die. in turn screwed to the punch plate. Experiments with these tools have shown that they are eminently satisfactory for parts up to The punch is used as a template for the pattern 16 s.w.g. mild steel or 12 s.w.g. light alloy for maker to make the mould for the female die to be cast from. When making the pattern for the runs up to 300 and 500 parts respectively. In die an allowance of 1/ in. all round on the aper­ point of fact it was found that the tool tended to improve with use over the first 250 parts. No trouble was experienced with small sharp corners, as might have been expected. trustees the Student may carry out his research . The object of the Studentship is to enable the BUSK STUDENTSHIP IN AERONAUTICS either at home or abroad. holder to engage in research, or preparation for This Studentship has been established in research, in aeronautics, of the kind in which Forms of application for for Studentship can memory of Edward Teshmaker Busk who, Edward Busk was specially interested. They were be obtained from The Professor of Aeronautical in 1914, lost his life while flying an experimental of the type which involved experimental as well Engineering, Engineering Laboratory, Cambridge aeroplane. as mathematical investigation. and must be filled up and returned to him on or A vacancy having arisen for the year 1948-49 the The Student will be expected to devote his before June 1. trustees invite applications and hope to make an whole time to research on a subject approved by Applicants should state the date of their birth, appointment during June next. the trustees and at the close of his Studentship their parentage and the parentage of their parents The Studentship is of the value of about £165, to make to them and to the University of Cam­ together with their previous training and quali­ tenable for one year from October 1; but a bridge a report on his work; he may also be fications for research in aeronautics and the subject of their proposed investigations. student may be reappointed on the same terms asked to deliver a lecture on the subject. He may for a second year. It is open to any man or not undertake other duties without the express They should also give the names of two persons woman being a British subject and of British consent of the trustees. The tenure of the Stud­ to whom reference may be made by the Trustees descent who has not attained the age of 25 years entship will depend on compliance with these and should state their readiness, if elected, to on October. 1 next. conditions. Subject to the permission of the comply with the conditions of the Studentship. 116 A ircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

K.M. Alloy Blanking and Press Bend Tools

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 20 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1948

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031627
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUE K.M. Alloy Blanking and Press Bend Tools The press bend tool shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 Press Bend Tools is a similar development to that already described. Again standard alloy bolsters are adopted—in this case there are two for the die—since these Particulars of the Experiences of Percival Aircraft Ltd., of Luton, in tools are primarily intended for forming standard the use of Alloy Tools in the Production of Detail Parts bends. The only work necessary on the bolster is the drilling and tapping of the two holes for the Percival Aircraft Ltd. have recently adopted a pressure pad screws and the machining of the most interesting sytem for the economical manu­ faces. The pressure pad too is cast in K.M. Alloy facture of small part press tools. The' material and machined. used is the K.M. Alloy low melting-point alloy Even in cases where a special, non-standard and by its use the tool room work on punches bend is required, the cost of these cast parts is far and dies has been drastically cut. The method is below that of the usual steel tool. not entirely original, but it is still comparatively Both the blanking and press bend tools effect little used. a great saving in tool cost, both because of the case of manufacture and in the cheaper (and re­ usable) materials. Further, when a modification Blanking Tools is introduced, the alteration of the pattern and The Percival design for blanking tools consists re-casting of the dies is a simple matter—this in of two sizes of standard bolster (FIG. 1) cast from turn prevents a lingering retention of some un­ the alloy and machined only on the top and suitable part because of the expense of changing bottom faces. The smaller bolster is suitable for it. part sup to 3 in. x 4 in., while the larger accom­ modates details as large as 3¾ in. X 8½ in. A standard punch plate, to be retained in the ture of the bolster is made so that machining, for press, has also been designed with a tee-slot and which due allowances are made, need only be on a standard set of holes for locating Allen screws the top and bottom faces. An allowance of 0.020 —0,030 in. undersize on the component profile is and Tee nuts. The holes in the punch plate are allowed so that the die can be cleaned out to size drilled from a Master Drill Plate in order to ensure that all punch plates will be interchange­ by pressing the punch through it. A clearance of able. This Master Drill Plate is, of course, again it in. on the profile is allowed all round to within used by the toolmaker when making the punches. 1/ in. of the top of the die. The punch itself is made from ⅜ in. thick mould An important improvement over earlier alloy blanking tools is the use of this clearance steel. After the punch has been made it is mounted so that the part falls away, instead of having to on the plate, or if it has a profile less than ½ in. wide, it is mounted on a small cast holder that is be lifted out of the die. in turn screwed to the punch plate. Experiments with these tools have shown that they are eminently satisfactory for parts up to The punch is used as a template for the pattern 16 s.w.g. mild steel or 12 s.w.g. light alloy for maker to make the mould for the female die to be cast from. When making the pattern for the runs up to 300 and 500 parts respectively. In die an allowance of 1/ in. all round on the aper­ point of fact it was found that the tool tended to improve with use over the first 250 parts. No trouble was experienced with small sharp corners, as might have been expected. trustees the Student may carry out his research . The object of the Studentship is to enable the BUSK STUDENTSHIP IN AERONAUTICS either at home or abroad. holder to engage in research, or preparation for This Studentship has been established in research, in aeronautics, of the kind in which Forms of application for for Studentship can memory of Edward Teshmaker Busk who, Edward Busk was specially interested. They were be obtained from The Professor of Aeronautical in 1914, lost his life while flying an experimental of the type which involved experimental as well Engineering, Engineering Laboratory, Cambridge aeroplane. as mathematical investigation. and must be filled up and returned to him on or A vacancy having arisen for the year 1948-49 the The Student will be expected to devote his before June 1. trustees invite applications and hope to make an whole time to research on a subject approved by Applicants should state the date of their birth, appointment during June next. the trustees and at the close of his Studentship their parentage and the parentage of their parents The Studentship is of the value of about £165, to make to them and to the University of Cam­ together with their previous training and quali­ tenable for one year from October 1; but a bridge a report on his work; he may also be fications for research in aeronautics and the subject of their proposed investigations. student may be reappointed on the same terms asked to deliver a lecture on the subject. He may for a second year. It is open to any man or not undertake other duties without the express They should also give the names of two persons woman being a British subject and of British consent of the trustees. The tenure of the Stud­ to whom reference may be made by the Trustees descent who has not attained the age of 25 years entship will depend on compliance with these and should state their readiness, if elected, to on October. 1 next. conditions. Subject to the permission of the comply with the conditions of the Studentship. 116 A ircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1948

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