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Johnson's Dictionary

Johnson's Dictionary Just two hundred years ago, on April 15th, 1755, there was published, in two large folio volumes, one of the greatest of English books, A Dictionary of the English Language, by Samuel Johnson, A.M., issued, after the manner of the time, by a group of shareholding booksellers, or, as we should call them, publishers, the Knaptons, the Longmans, Hitch and Hawes, Millar, and the Dodsleys. Such a singlehanded work can hardly ever have been seen. The French forty Immortals of the Academy had taken forty years over their dictionary of the French language Johnson proposed to take three he actually took about seven over his, a comparison which provided him with material for a sportive equation of an Englishman to a Frenchman being as three is to forty multiplied by forty, i.e., 1,600. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Review Emerald Publishing

Johnson's Dictionary

Library Review , Volume 15 (3): 4 – Mar 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0024-2535
DOI
10.1108/eb012236
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Just two hundred years ago, on April 15th, 1755, there was published, in two large folio volumes, one of the greatest of English books, A Dictionary of the English Language, by Samuel Johnson, A.M., issued, after the manner of the time, by a group of shareholding booksellers, or, as we should call them, publishers, the Knaptons, the Longmans, Hitch and Hawes, Millar, and the Dodsleys. Such a singlehanded work can hardly ever have been seen. The French forty Immortals of the Academy had taken forty years over their dictionary of the French language Johnson proposed to take three he actually took about seven over his, a comparison which provided him with material for a sportive equation of an Englishman to a Frenchman being as three is to forty multiplied by forty, i.e., 1,600.

Journal

Library ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1955

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