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Job‐to‐job turnover and job‐to‐non‐employment movement A case study investigation

Job‐to‐job turnover and job‐to‐non‐employment movement A case study investigation This paper analyses an establishment-based data set of voluntary quits. Exit interview data identifies two discrete types of quitters, viz. those who quit to accept alternative jobs offering superior terms and conditions of employment and those who quit for other reasons and without having alternative jobs to go to. A binomial logit model is estimated to identify the probability of quitting for reasons of having been offered and having accepted alternative employment. This probability is seen to be both gender and grade related. Females are less likely to quit for this reason. Individuals occupying the financially better rewarded grades are more likely to quit for this reason. Policy recommendations are forwarded based on the analysis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Review Emerald Publishing

Job‐to‐job turnover and job‐to‐non‐employment movement A case study investigation

Personnel Review , Volume 31 (6): 12 – Dec 1, 2002

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References (30)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0048-3486
DOI
10.1108/00483480210445980
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper analyses an establishment-based data set of voluntary quits. Exit interview data identifies two discrete types of quitters, viz. those who quit to accept alternative jobs offering superior terms and conditions of employment and those who quit for other reasons and without having alternative jobs to go to. A binomial logit model is estimated to identify the probability of quitting for reasons of having been offered and having accepted alternative employment. This probability is seen to be both gender and grade related. Females are less likely to quit for this reason. Individuals occupying the financially better rewarded grades are more likely to quit for this reason. Policy recommendations are forwarded based on the analysis.

Journal

Personnel ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2002

Keywords: Labour market; Unemployment; Gender; Human resource management

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