Job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) Does team commitment make a difference in self‐directed teams?

Job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) Does team commitment make a... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a model in which team commitment in self‐directed teams moderates the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaires measuring team commitment, OCB, and job satisfaction were administered to 242 full‐time employees who were involved in self‐directed teams at three geographically diverse manufacturing facilities. After carefully testing the psychometric properties of the scales, hierarchical multiple regression was used to test hypotheses. Findings – The relationship between job satisfaction and OCB was shown to be significant, as was the relationship between team commitment and OCB. Most importantly, the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior was moderated by team commitment, such that the relationship was stronger when team commitment was high. Research limitations/implications – Due to heightened salience of self‐directed team functioning in our sample, generalization of results may be limited. Practical implications – The findings indicate that the usefulness of self‐directed work teams may be limited in situations where employees lack team commitment. Besides implementing self‐directed teams and assigning performance goals, researchers and practitioners need to identify efforts that work toward increasing commitment of team members, thereby increasing organizational citizenship behavior in the organization. Originality/value – It is believed that this research makes a significant contribution to understanding the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior, a relationship that has long been known but not well defined. Moreover, the paper develops what appears to be a valid and reliable measure of team commitment, based on goodness of fit using cross‐validation, confirmatory factor analysis, and reliability tests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Decision Emerald Publishing

Job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) Does team commitment make a difference in self‐directed teams?

Management Decision, Volume 46 (6): 15 – Jun 20, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0025-1747
DOI
10.1108/00251740810882680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a model in which team commitment in self‐directed teams moderates the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaires measuring team commitment, OCB, and job satisfaction were administered to 242 full‐time employees who were involved in self‐directed teams at three geographically diverse manufacturing facilities. After carefully testing the psychometric properties of the scales, hierarchical multiple regression was used to test hypotheses. Findings – The relationship between job satisfaction and OCB was shown to be significant, as was the relationship between team commitment and OCB. Most importantly, the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior was moderated by team commitment, such that the relationship was stronger when team commitment was high. Research limitations/implications – Due to heightened salience of self‐directed team functioning in our sample, generalization of results may be limited. Practical implications – The findings indicate that the usefulness of self‐directed work teams may be limited in situations where employees lack team commitment. Besides implementing self‐directed teams and assigning performance goals, researchers and practitioners need to identify efforts that work toward increasing commitment of team members, thereby increasing organizational citizenship behavior in the organization. Originality/value – It is believed that this research makes a significant contribution to understanding the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior, a relationship that has long been known but not well defined. Moreover, the paper develops what appears to be a valid and reliable measure of team commitment, based on goodness of fit using cross‐validation, confirmatory factor analysis, and reliability tests.

Journal

Management DecisionEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 20, 2008

Keywords: Team working; Job satisfaction; Organizational behaviour

References

  • Organizational anomie as of the relationship between an unfavorable attitudinal environment and citizenship behavior (OCB) – an empirical study among university administration and services personnel
    De Lara, P.Z.M.; Rodriguez, T.F.E.
  • Leadership styles and group organizational citizenship behavior across cultures
    Euwema, M.C.; Wendt, H.; Van Emmerik, H.
  • The impact of personality and team context on the relationship between workplace injustice and counterproductive work behavior
    Flaherty, S.; Moss, S.A.
  • The effects of employee satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior, and turnover on organizational effectiveness: a unit‐level, longitudinal study
    Koys, D.J.
  • A meta‐analytic review of attitudinal and dispositional predictors of organizational citizenship behavior
    Organ, D.W.; Ryan, K.
  • Self‐managing work teams
    Tang, T.L.P.; Crofford, A.B.
  • To help or not to help? The Good Samaritan effect and the love of money on helping behavior
    Tang, T.L.P.; Sutarso, T.; Davis, G.M.T.; Dolinski, D.; Ibrahim, A.H.S.; Wagner, S.L.
  • The impact of psychological contract breach on work‐related outcomes: a meta‐analysis
    Zhao, H.; Wayne, S.J.; Glibkowski, B.C.; Bravo, J.

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