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Job exhaustion among assigned and self-initiated expatriates – the role of effort and reward

Job exhaustion among assigned and self-initiated expatriates – the role of effort and reward This study explores whether expatriation type (assigned expatriates (AEs) versus self-initiated expatriates (SIEs)) is linked to job exhaustion via possible differences in required efforts for their jobs and the rewards they gain from them, and/or the balance between efforts and rewards. Adopting effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and job demands/resources (JD-R) theories, the authors study the possible role of ERI as a mediator between expatriation type and job exhaustion.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was carried out in co-operation with two Finnish trade unions, providing representative data from 484 assigned and SIEs. The authors test this study’s hypotheses through latent structural equation modelling, and the analysis was conducted with Stata 17.0 software.FindingsThe results show that ERI between them are correlated with the job exhaustion of expatriates in general and there are no direct links between expatriation type and job exhaustion. The required effort from AEs was higher than that from SIEs though no difference was found for rewards, and the match between effort demands and rewards is less favourable for AEs than SIEs. AEs experienced higher job exhaustion than SIEs because of the higher effort demands and greater imbalance between efforts and rewards.Originality/valueThe study examines the work well-being of two types of expatriates and explores the underlying mechanisms that may explain why they may differ from each other. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research Emerald Publishing

Job exhaustion among assigned and self-initiated expatriates – the role of effort and reward

Job exhaustion among assigned and self-initiated expatriates – the role of effort and reward


Abstract

This study explores whether expatriation type (assigned expatriates (AEs) versus self-initiated expatriates (SIEs)) is linked to job exhaustion via possible differences in required efforts for their jobs and the rewards they gain from them, and/or the balance between efforts and rewards. Adopting effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and job demands/resources (JD-R) theories, the authors study the possible role of ERI as a mediator between expatriation type and job exhaustion.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was carried out in co-operation with two Finnish trade unions, providing representative data from 484 assigned and SIEs. The authors test this study’s hypotheses through latent structural equation modelling, and the analysis was conducted with Stata 17.0 software.FindingsThe results show that ERI between them are correlated with the job exhaustion of expatriates in general and there are no direct links between expatriation type and job exhaustion. The required effort from AEs was higher than that from SIEs though no difference was found for rewards, and the match between effort demands and rewards is less favourable for AEs than SIEs. AEs experienced higher job exhaustion than SIEs because of the higher effort demands and greater imbalance between efforts and rewards.Originality/valueThe study examines the work well-being of two types of expatriates and explores the underlying mechanisms that may explain why they may differ from each other.

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Liisa Mäkelä, Vesa Suutari, Anni Rajala and Chris Brewster
ISSN
2049-8799
DOI
10.1108/jgm-06-2022-0028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study explores whether expatriation type (assigned expatriates (AEs) versus self-initiated expatriates (SIEs)) is linked to job exhaustion via possible differences in required efforts for their jobs and the rewards they gain from them, and/or the balance between efforts and rewards. Adopting effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and job demands/resources (JD-R) theories, the authors study the possible role of ERI as a mediator between expatriation type and job exhaustion.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was carried out in co-operation with two Finnish trade unions, providing representative data from 484 assigned and SIEs. The authors test this study’s hypotheses through latent structural equation modelling, and the analysis was conducted with Stata 17.0 software.FindingsThe results show that ERI between them are correlated with the job exhaustion of expatriates in general and there are no direct links between expatriation type and job exhaustion. The required effort from AEs was higher than that from SIEs though no difference was found for rewards, and the match between effort demands and rewards is less favourable for AEs than SIEs. AEs experienced higher job exhaustion than SIEs because of the higher effort demands and greater imbalance between efforts and rewards.Originality/valueThe study examines the work well-being of two types of expatriates and explores the underlying mechanisms that may explain why they may differ from each other.

Journal

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 2, 2022

Keywords: Self-initiated expatriates; Assigned expatriates; Job exhaustion; Effort–reward imbalance; Job demands-resources

References