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Job and work attitudes, engagement and employee performance Where does psychological well‐being fit in?

Job and work attitudes, engagement and employee performance Where does psychological well‐being... Purpose – This article aims to test the hypothesis that employee productivity levels will be better predicted by a combination of positive job and work attitudes (employee engagement) and psychological well‐being than by positive job and work attitudes alone. Design/methodology/approach – Survey data using psychometrically sound measures of the key constructs were collected for a sample of over 9,000 people across 12 organisations. Findings – Multiple regression analyses reveal that psychological well‐being has incremental value over and above that of positive job and work attitudes in predicting self‐reported levels of performance. Research limitations/implications – The study design involves cross sectional self‐report data and as such firm conclusions about causality cannot be drawn. Practical implications – The results suggest that if employers focus only on job and work attitudes and ignore employee psychological well‐being, they will limit the benefits that can be obtained through initiatives such as programmes designed to improve employee engagement. Originality/value – The study provides evidence that two previously separate constructs are both important in predicting measures of employee productivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leadership & Organization Development Journal Emerald Publishing

Job and work attitudes, engagement and employee performance Where does psychological well‐being fit in?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0143-7739
DOI
10.1108/01437731211216443
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This article aims to test the hypothesis that employee productivity levels will be better predicted by a combination of positive job and work attitudes (employee engagement) and psychological well‐being than by positive job and work attitudes alone. Design/methodology/approach – Survey data using psychometrically sound measures of the key constructs were collected for a sample of over 9,000 people across 12 organisations. Findings – Multiple regression analyses reveal that psychological well‐being has incremental value over and above that of positive job and work attitudes in predicting self‐reported levels of performance. Research limitations/implications – The study design involves cross sectional self‐report data and as such firm conclusions about causality cannot be drawn. Practical implications – The results suggest that if employers focus only on job and work attitudes and ignore employee psychological well‐being, they will limit the benefits that can be obtained through initiatives such as programmes designed to improve employee engagement. Originality/value – The study provides evidence that two previously separate constructs are both important in predicting measures of employee productivity.

Journal

Leadership & Organization Development JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 4, 2012

Keywords: Wellbeing; Engagement; Employee performance; Job and work attitudes; Personnel psychology; Employees productivity

References

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