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Is systematic osteoporosis prevention and detection possible in a district hospital

Is systematic osteoporosis prevention and detection possible in a district hospital Osteoporosis demands systematic management for optimum use of resources. Guidelines from the Primary Care Rheumatology Society PCRS aim to improve its diagnosis and treatment. We identified all admissions over three months to a district general hospital of patients with fracture of femur, vertebra, or distal forearm and of women who underwent oophorectomy or hysterectomy. We audited their care using the criteria that the diagnosis and risk of osteoporosis should be recorded that management should follow PCRS guidelines and that this information should be communicated to general practitioners. An ideal standard of 100 compliance with these criteria was chosen. Overwhelmingly these audit criteria were not met, the only one that was met being the prescription of hormone replacement therapy after oophorectomy. Potential for prevention of 35 of hip and distal forearm fractures was identified, the commonest risk factor being longterm corticosteroid therapy. Identification of high risk patients is feasible by simple methods and their management needs improvement. We suggest that a longterm corticosteroid therapy register and a dedicated osteoporosis service would facilitate this. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Effectiveness Emerald Publishing

Is systematic osteoporosis prevention and detection possible in a district hospital

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1361-5874
DOI
10.1108/eb020863
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Osteoporosis demands systematic management for optimum use of resources. Guidelines from the Primary Care Rheumatology Society PCRS aim to improve its diagnosis and treatment. We identified all admissions over three months to a district general hospital of patients with fracture of femur, vertebra, or distal forearm and of women who underwent oophorectomy or hysterectomy. We audited their care using the criteria that the diagnosis and risk of osteoporosis should be recorded that management should follow PCRS guidelines and that this information should be communicated to general practitioners. An ideal standard of 100 compliance with these criteria was chosen. Overwhelmingly these audit criteria were not met, the only one that was met being the prescription of hormone replacement therapy after oophorectomy. Potential for prevention of 35 of hip and distal forearm fractures was identified, the commonest risk factor being longterm corticosteroid therapy. Identification of high risk patients is feasible by simple methods and their management needs improvement. We suggest that a longterm corticosteroid therapy register and a dedicated osteoporosis service would facilitate this.

Journal

Journal of Clinical EffectivenessEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1997

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