Investigating homeowners' interest in property‐level flood protection

Investigating homeowners' interest in property‐level flood protection Purpose – The inevitability of climate change and its consequences brings on the need to find new ways of adapting to extreme events, such as floods. One immediate measure would be to make physical improvements to houses to either prevent their inundation or minimise the damage when flood waters enter premises. Currently, the level of implementation of these measures is low. This paper aims to assess the willingness of house owners living in flood risk zones to carry out works that make their homes better protected against flooding. Design/methodology/approach – Householders (101) in low‐ and medium‐income areas of Salford, north west of England were interviewed on their perceptions of climate change consequences, willingness to make physical improvements to their properties and preparedness to pay for them. Findings – The homeowners are concerned about the climate change effects on their homes, feel responsible for protection of their properties against flooding and express interest in several flood protection measures. The median value respondents are willing to pay is under £100. Research limitations/implications – This study is carried out on a small sample of respondents and national‐scale survey is recommended. Practical implications – There is a need for action to increase the motivation to invest in property‐level flood measures among house owners, which should include awareness raising actions, subsidies and incentives promoting sustainable behaviour. Originality/value – The paper investigates the new subject of property‐level flood protection and provides a comprehensive analysis of homeowners' perceptions of climate change risks and willingness to act. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment Emerald Publishing

Investigating homeowners' interest in property‐level flood protection

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1759-5908
D.O.I.
10.1108/17595901011056622
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The inevitability of climate change and its consequences brings on the need to find new ways of adapting to extreme events, such as floods. One immediate measure would be to make physical improvements to houses to either prevent their inundation or minimise the damage when flood waters enter premises. Currently, the level of implementation of these measures is low. This paper aims to assess the willingness of house owners living in flood risk zones to carry out works that make their homes better protected against flooding. Design/methodology/approach – Householders (101) in low‐ and medium‐income areas of Salford, north west of England were interviewed on their perceptions of climate change consequences, willingness to make physical improvements to their properties and preparedness to pay for them. Findings – The homeowners are concerned about the climate change effects on their homes, feel responsible for protection of their properties against flooding and express interest in several flood protection measures. The median value respondents are willing to pay is under £100. Research limitations/implications – This study is carried out on a small sample of respondents and national‐scale survey is recommended. Practical implications – There is a need for action to increase the motivation to invest in property‐level flood measures among house owners, which should include awareness raising actions, subsidies and incentives promoting sustainable behaviour. Originality/value – The paper investigates the new subject of property‐level flood protection and provides a comprehensive analysis of homeowners' perceptions of climate change risks and willingness to act.

Journal

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built EnvironmentEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 16, 2010

Keywords: United Kingdom; Residential property; Floods; Individual perception

References

  • Adaptive capacity and human cognition: the process of individual adaptation to climate change
    Grothmann, T.; Patt, A.
  • Barriers perceived to engaging with climate change among the UK public and their policy implications
    Lorenzoni, I.; Nicholson‐Cole, S.; Whitmarsh, L.
  • City form and natural process' – indicators for the ecological performance of urban areas and their application to Merseyside, UK
    Whitford, V.; Ennos, A.R.; Handley, J.F.

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