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Invention commercialization among Russian scientists: bridging the gap between ideational and material realms

Invention commercialization among Russian scientists: bridging the gap between ideational and... The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the article explores an understudied side of invention commercialization–the rejection of business as something “dirty” among Russian scientists. As such, the paper contributes to the individual-level explanations of innovation promotion, hence balancing extant literature's excessive focus on institutional explanations. Second, the article suggests that Russian scientists' rejection of business is rooted in broader Russian work ethics rift between “material” and “ideational” aspects of life. As such, the paper shows how dominant collective values refract in the management practice of specific social class, i.e. of scientists.Design/methodology/approachTo analyze the rift between material and ideational aspects of Russian scientists' work, the article employs directed content analysis (DCA) of in-depth interviews with 45 Russian scholars. To address credibility bias of the research findings stemming from DCA, I further draw on the survey of existing studies, researches and polls highlighting Russian population attitudes toward the dichotomy between “material” and “ideal” realms.FindingsThis study argues that Russian scientists' likelihood of invention commercialization is positively associated with their ability to integrate in a personal psyche business and science as equally valuable facets of life.Originality/valueThe article identifies the three groups of scientists – opportunity-seekers, idealists and integrators – with different attitudes to invention commercialization. The article shows how policymakers should apply institutional incentives differently to each group of scientists to achieve higher rates of invention commercialization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross Cultural & Strategic Management Emerald Publishing

Invention commercialization among Russian scientists: bridging the gap between ideational and material realms

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management , Volume 28 (1): 24 – Jan 20, 2021

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References (45)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2059-5794
DOI
10.1108/ccsm-12-2019-0224
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the article explores an understudied side of invention commercialization–the rejection of business as something “dirty” among Russian scientists. As such, the paper contributes to the individual-level explanations of innovation promotion, hence balancing extant literature's excessive focus on institutional explanations. Second, the article suggests that Russian scientists' rejection of business is rooted in broader Russian work ethics rift between “material” and “ideational” aspects of life. As such, the paper shows how dominant collective values refract in the management practice of specific social class, i.e. of scientists.Design/methodology/approachTo analyze the rift between material and ideational aspects of Russian scientists' work, the article employs directed content analysis (DCA) of in-depth interviews with 45 Russian scholars. To address credibility bias of the research findings stemming from DCA, I further draw on the survey of existing studies, researches and polls highlighting Russian population attitudes toward the dichotomy between “material” and “ideal” realms.FindingsThis study argues that Russian scientists' likelihood of invention commercialization is positively associated with their ability to integrate in a personal psyche business and science as equally valuable facets of life.Originality/valueThe article identifies the three groups of scientists – opportunity-seekers, idealists and integrators – with different attitudes to invention commercialization. The article shows how policymakers should apply institutional incentives differently to each group of scientists to achieve higher rates of invention commercialization.

Journal

Cross Cultural & Strategic ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 20, 2021

Keywords: Russia; Innovation; Invention commercialization; aterial and ideational; Religious work ethics; Scientists

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