Internet consumer catalog shopping: findings from an exploratory study and directions for future research

Internet consumer catalog shopping: findings from an exploratory study and directions for future... Internet shopping has received considerable attention in the popular press as the future of in‐home shopping. Although actual sales figures attributed to this direct mode of shopping are relatively modest in comparison to predictions, there are too many potential benefits to consumers and retailers alike to ignore Internet shopping as a fad. The authors present findings from an exploratory, empirical investigation of perceptions of Internet catalog shopping and more traditional print catalog shopping. The study extends previous research on strategy developments for direct modes of shopping and examines two factors (personality and important other people) that might influence perceptions. Preliminary results suggest that there are significant differences in individuals’ perceptions of Internet catalog shopping and print catalog shopping, and perceptions differ by individual differences in personality (levels of need‐for‐cognition) and influence of important other people. Finally, the authors present research propositions that deserve further attention. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Internet Research Emerald Publishing

Internet consumer catalog shopping: findings from an exploratory study and directions for future research

Internet Research, Volume 8 (4): 9 – Oct 1, 1998

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1066-2243
DOI
10.1108/10662249810231069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Internet shopping has received considerable attention in the popular press as the future of in‐home shopping. Although actual sales figures attributed to this direct mode of shopping are relatively modest in comparison to predictions, there are too many potential benefits to consumers and retailers alike to ignore Internet shopping as a fad. The authors present findings from an exploratory, empirical investigation of perceptions of Internet catalog shopping and more traditional print catalog shopping. The study extends previous research on strategy developments for direct modes of shopping and examines two factors (personality and important other people) that might influence perceptions. Preliminary results suggest that there are significant differences in individuals’ perceptions of Internet catalog shopping and print catalog shopping, and perceptions differ by individual differences in personality (levels of need‐for‐cognition) and influence of important other people. Finally, the authors present research propositions that deserve further attention.

Journal

Internet ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1998

Keywords: Catalogue retailing; Consumer attitudes; Consumer marketing; Internet; Home shopping

References

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