International trade and sustainable development in Sub‐Saharan Africa

International trade and sustainable development in Sub‐Saharan Africa Examines the role of trade in promoting sustainable economic development in Sub‐Saharan African (SSA) countries. Opponents of trade liberalization argue that it results in environmental degradation. While there may be adverse environmental impacts from certain trade‐related economic activities, trade expansion could lead to increase in income that could be used to fund poverty reduction programs. Factors such as lack of macroeconomic and political stability, high labour costs, low skills and inability to tap into international marketing networks have inhibited trade expansion in the region. Firms in SSA could exploit their export potential by forming links with counterparts in the advanced countries. Advocates for governments in SSA to move away from command and control mechanisms towards market‐based incentive mechanisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Social Economics Emerald Publishing

International trade and sustainable development in Sub‐Saharan Africa

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0306-8293
DOI
10.1108/03068290410523421
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examines the role of trade in promoting sustainable economic development in Sub‐Saharan African (SSA) countries. Opponents of trade liberalization argue that it results in environmental degradation. While there may be adverse environmental impacts from certain trade‐related economic activities, trade expansion could lead to increase in income that could be used to fund poverty reduction programs. Factors such as lack of macroeconomic and political stability, high labour costs, low skills and inability to tap into international marketing networks have inhibited trade expansion in the region. Firms in SSA could exploit their export potential by forming links with counterparts in the advanced countries. Advocates for governments in SSA to move away from command and control mechanisms towards market‐based incentive mechanisms.

Journal

International Journal of Social EconomicsEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 2004

Keywords: Sustainable development; Sub Saharan Africa; International trade

References

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