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Intellectual Precursors of Perestroika

Intellectual Precursors of Perestroika This article investigates the intellectual roots of perestroika. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, the architect of perestroika claims that his programmes and policies are aimed at arevolutionary transformation of the Soviet economy from an overlycentralised command system of management to a democratic system basedmainly on economic methods and on an optimal combination of centralismand selfmanagement. To facilitate the restructuring process, Gorbachevsimultaneously initiated two sweeping political reforms glasnost no radical change is possible without it and demokratizatsiya there is no presentday socialism, nor canthere be, without democracy. Therefore, prominent featuresenvisaged by perestroika would presumably include an optimalcombination between centralism and selfmanagement, that would implydecentralisation in the economic management of the country replacementof administrative methods by economic methods, that would emphasiseeconomic incentives and market processes more than machineries ofcentral planning democratisation and openness in Soviet society, aimedat guaranteeing greater democratic rights for citizens, and pluralism ingovernmental and political processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Social Economics Emerald Publishing

Intellectual Precursors of Perestroika

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0306-8293
DOI
10.1108/03068299110137046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article investigates the intellectual roots of perestroika. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, the architect of perestroika claims that his programmes and policies are aimed at arevolutionary transformation of the Soviet economy from an overlycentralised command system of management to a democratic system basedmainly on economic methods and on an optimal combination of centralismand selfmanagement. To facilitate the restructuring process, Gorbachevsimultaneously initiated two sweeping political reforms glasnost no radical change is possible without it and demokratizatsiya there is no presentday socialism, nor canthere be, without democracy. Therefore, prominent featuresenvisaged by perestroika would presumably include an optimalcombination between centralism and selfmanagement, that would implydecentralisation in the economic management of the country replacementof administrative methods by economic methods, that would emphasiseeconomic incentives and market processes more than machineries ofcentral planning democratisation and openness in Soviet society, aimedat guaranteeing greater democratic rights for citizens, and pluralism ingovernmental and political processes.

Journal

International Journal of Social EconomicsEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1991

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