Instructor beliefs and their mediation of instructor strategies

Instructor beliefs and their mediation of instructor strategies Purpose – The overall aim of this research is to investigate how aspects of organizational culture enable or constrain the facilitation of learning in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative design was used involving 100 semi‐structured interviews conducted with air traffic controllers operating in three centers in Australia. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach in an attempt to uncover the lived experience of those interviewed. Findings – The study illustrates how elements of organizational culture evidenced in collectively held values and beliefs mediated the approaches used by on‐the‐job‐training instructors. Three collectively held values and beliefs were identified: belief in ability; the value of performance in demonstrating ability; and the need to exude confidence. The degree to which instructors espoused these beliefs influences the type of instructional strategy they used. Three predominant strategies of engagement with the trainee were identified: acting on, working with, and working against the trainee. Practical implications – The evidence here suggests that programs aimed at facilitating skills development for on‐the‐job‐training instructors need to focus on the existing knowledge and beliefs of those personnel and to provide opportunities for challenge and confrontation of those belief systems. Originality/value – The paper contributes to a growing understanding of the socio‐cultural influences present in workplace learning and the role of stereotyping and power in enabling or constraining the learning in the workplace. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Workplace Learning Emerald Publishing

Instructor beliefs and their mediation of instructor strategies

Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 21 (6): 19 – Aug 7, 2009

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1366-5626
DOI
10.1108/13665620910976757
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The overall aim of this research is to investigate how aspects of organizational culture enable or constrain the facilitation of learning in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative design was used involving 100 semi‐structured interviews conducted with air traffic controllers operating in three centers in Australia. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach in an attempt to uncover the lived experience of those interviewed. Findings – The study illustrates how elements of organizational culture evidenced in collectively held values and beliefs mediated the approaches used by on‐the‐job‐training instructors. Three collectively held values and beliefs were identified: belief in ability; the value of performance in demonstrating ability; and the need to exude confidence. The degree to which instructors espoused these beliefs influences the type of instructional strategy they used. Three predominant strategies of engagement with the trainee were identified: acting on, working with, and working against the trainee. Practical implications – The evidence here suggests that programs aimed at facilitating skills development for on‐the‐job‐training instructors need to focus on the existing knowledge and beliefs of those personnel and to provide opportunities for challenge and confrontation of those belief systems. Originality/value – The paper contributes to a growing understanding of the socio‐cultural influences present in workplace learning and the role of stereotyping and power in enabling or constraining the learning in the workplace.

Journal

Journal of Workplace LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 7, 2009

Keywords: Air traffic control; Instructors; Organizational culture; Workplace learning; Australia

References

  • Social schemas
    Augoustinos, M.; Walker, I.
  • Learning from others at work: communities of practice and informal learning
    Boud, D.; Middleton, H.
  • Connecting work and learning: design engineers' learning at work
    Collin, K.
  • Contextual factors influencing the facilitation of others' learning through everyday work experiences
    Ellinger, A.D.; Cseh, M.
  • Informal learning in the workplace
    Eraut, M.
  • Learning in interactive work situations: it takes two to tango: why not invite both partners to dance?
    Koopmans, H.; Doornbos, A.; Van Eekelen, I.

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