Innovative systemic approach for promoting sustainable innovation for zero construction waste

Innovative systemic approach for promoting sustainable innovation for zero construction waste Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on optimization of recycling of concrete from lightweight aggregates containing expanded glass and hard polyurethane (PU) and on the issue of importance of environmental management in constructions, to produce the new combination using rest, construction waste of concrete from lightweight aggregates and hard PU new raw components of concrete from lightweight aggregates, as key reactive materials. Design/methodology/approach – The research for this paper is based on the collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, non‐linear programming (NLP) model and experimental research. Findings – Results from the new recycled material have been compared with the normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. Characteristics of recycled lightweight concrete (LWC) such as density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity have been investigated and have been compared with normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. Results indicate that it is possible to recycle LWC aggregates and hard PU waste. Research limitations/implications – Research was limited to management of construction. Practical implications – The use of waste LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass and hard PU seems to be necessary for the production of cheaper and environment‐friendly LWC. Originality/value – The method shows great possibilities for increasing use of construction waste materials from LWC containing expanded glass and hard PU in order to benefit from the better use of existing construction waste. Characteristics such as density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity from the new recycled material have been compared with normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. They change depending on the type and part of waste as well as the type and part of fresh binding components. Thus, a new recycled material is created with new values of density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity, which conform to the compressive strength class and rules on heat protection and efficient use of energy in buildings (SI OJ RS No. 42/2002). Laboratory density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity tests results showed that LWC can be produced by the use of waste LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass and hard PU. The author proposes a model of recycling isolating materials, made of hard PU and LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass, based on recycling and NLP. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Kybernetes Emerald Publishing

Innovative systemic approach for promoting sustainable innovation for zero construction waste

Kybernetes, Volume 40 (1/2): 15 – Mar 15, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0368-492X
DOI
10.1108/03684921111118040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on optimization of recycling of concrete from lightweight aggregates containing expanded glass and hard polyurethane (PU) and on the issue of importance of environmental management in constructions, to produce the new combination using rest, construction waste of concrete from lightweight aggregates and hard PU new raw components of concrete from lightweight aggregates, as key reactive materials. Design/methodology/approach – The research for this paper is based on the collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, non‐linear programming (NLP) model and experimental research. Findings – Results from the new recycled material have been compared with the normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. Characteristics of recycled lightweight concrete (LWC) such as density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity have been investigated and have been compared with normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. Results indicate that it is possible to recycle LWC aggregates and hard PU waste. Research limitations/implications – Research was limited to management of construction. Practical implications – The use of waste LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass and hard PU seems to be necessary for the production of cheaper and environment‐friendly LWC. Originality/value – The method shows great possibilities for increasing use of construction waste materials from LWC containing expanded glass and hard PU in order to benefit from the better use of existing construction waste. Characteristics such as density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity from the new recycled material have been compared with normal existing concrete from lightweight aggregates. They change depending on the type and part of waste as well as the type and part of fresh binding components. Thus, a new recycled material is created with new values of density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity, which conform to the compressive strength class and rules on heat protection and efficient use of energy in buildings (SI OJ RS No. 42/2002). Laboratory density, compressive strength and thermal conductivity tests results showed that LWC can be produced by the use of waste LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass and hard PU. The author proposes a model of recycling isolating materials, made of hard PU and LWC with aggregates containing expanded glass, based on recycling and NLP.

Journal

KybernetesEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 15, 2011

Keywords: Concretes; Compressive strength; Density; Recycling; Thermal conductivity; Cybernetics

References

  • Planning biodegradable waste management in Stockholm
    Björklund, A.; Bjuggren, C.; Dalemo, M.; Sonesson, U.
  • Dialectal system approach supporting environmental innovation for sustainable development
    Kralj, D.

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