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Information Technology and Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Exploring the IntermediaryEnd User Interface in a Policy Framework

Information Technology and Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Exploring the IntermediaryEnd User... Federal attempts to stimulate technological innovation have been unsuccessful because of the application of an inappropriate policy framework that lacks conceptual and empirical knowledge of the process of technological innovation and fails to acknowledge the relationship between knowledge production, transfer, and use as equally important components of the process of knowledge diffusion. This article argues that the potential contributions of highspeed computing and networking systems will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge about the informationseeking behavior of the members of the social system is incorporated into a new policy framework. Findings from the NASADoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project are presented in support of this assertion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Internet Research Emerald Publishing

Information Technology and Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Exploring the IntermediaryEnd User Interface in a Policy Framework

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References (12)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1066-2243
DOI
10.1108/eb047258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Federal attempts to stimulate technological innovation have been unsuccessful because of the application of an inappropriate policy framework that lacks conceptual and empirical knowledge of the process of technological innovation and fails to acknowledge the relationship between knowledge production, transfer, and use as equally important components of the process of knowledge diffusion. This article argues that the potential contributions of highspeed computing and networking systems will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge about the informationseeking behavior of the members of the social system is incorporated into a new policy framework. Findings from the NASADoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project are presented in support of this assertion.

Journal

Internet ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1992

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