Information seeking on the Web by women in IT professions

Information seeking on the Web by women in IT professions The paper develops a behavioral model of Web information seeking that identifies four complementary modes of information seeking: undirected viewing, conditioned viewing, informal search, and formal search. In each mode of viewing or searching, users would adopt distinctive patterns of browser moves: starting, chaining, browsing, differentiating, monitoring, and extracting. The model is applied empirically to analyze the Web information seeking behavior of 24 women in IT professions over a two‐week period. Our results show that participants engaged in all four modes of information seeking on the Web, and that each mode may be characterized by certain browser actions. Overall, the study suggests that a behavioral approach that links information seeking modes (goals and reasons for browsing and searching) to moves (actions used to find and view information) may be helpful in understanding Web‐based information seeking. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Internet Research Emerald Publishing

Information seeking on the Web by women in IT professions

Internet Research, Volume 13 (4): 14 – Oct 1, 2003

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1066-2243
DOI
10.1108/10662240310488951
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper develops a behavioral model of Web information seeking that identifies four complementary modes of information seeking: undirected viewing, conditioned viewing, informal search, and formal search. In each mode of viewing or searching, users would adopt distinctive patterns of browser moves: starting, chaining, browsing, differentiating, monitoring, and extracting. The model is applied empirically to analyze the Web information seeking behavior of 24 women in IT professions over a two‐week period. Our results show that participants engaged in all four modes of information seeking on the Web, and that each mode may be characterized by certain browser actions. Overall, the study suggests that a behavioral approach that links information seeking modes (goals and reasons for browsing and searching) to moves (actions used to find and view information) may be helpful in understanding Web‐based information seeking.

Journal

Internet ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2003

Keywords: Generation and dissemination of information; Worldwide web; Women; Internet; Information network; Information gathering

References

  • Modelling the information seeking patterns of engineers and research scientists in an industrial environment
    Ellis, D.; Haugan, M.
  • Cognitive and task influences on Web searching behavior
    Kim, K.‐S.; Allen, B.
  • Revisitation patterns in World Wide Web navigation
    Tauscher, L.; Greenberg, S.

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