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Inequities in visible minority Immigrant Women's Healthcare accessibility

Inequities in visible minority Immigrant Women's Healthcare accessibility Purpose – In this article visible minority immigrant women's encounters and perceptions in accessing healthcare in Canada are explored. The aim is to understand the role play of the vulnerability statuses, gender, visibility, immigration and their intersectionality as factors contributing to (in)equitiesin healthcare accessibility. Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative data were collected from a sample of 32 adult immigrant women, living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, using five focus group meetings. The participants have migrated from five regions of the world; South‐Eastern Asia, Middle‐Eastern Asia, the African continent, Latin/South America and non‐English speaking countries in Eastern Europe. Data were analysed using an inductive coding using the cultural health capital framework. Findings – The findings reveal that audio and visual personal attributes such as skin colour, accent and excess body weight that are beyond Canadian norms lead to unfavourable interpersonal dynamics. Fundamental causes of diseases and clinical discourses are embedded in ethno‐cultural realties of gender, ethno‐racial identity, English communication styles and immigration related economic downturns. Research limitations/implications – Individual level recommendations include self efficacy and empowerment. Policies and program level recommendations include enhancement of multicultural realms of healthcare to promote equity in healthcare accessibility. Originality/value – Utilization of cultural health capital framework to illustrate inequities in healthcare accessibility, for visible and audible minority immigrant women, living in a country with universal healthcare coverage, brings a novel conceptual approach. New policy implications stemmed from the original research findings. Canadian cultural health capital framework that was developed in this article can be applied to illustrate other minorities' healthcare accessibility. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care Emerald Publishing

Inequities in visible minority Immigrant Women's Healthcare accessibility

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1757-0980
DOI
10.1108/17570981211286750
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – In this article visible minority immigrant women's encounters and perceptions in accessing healthcare in Canada are explored. The aim is to understand the role play of the vulnerability statuses, gender, visibility, immigration and their intersectionality as factors contributing to (in)equitiesin healthcare accessibility. Design/methodology/approach – Qualitative data were collected from a sample of 32 adult immigrant women, living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, using five focus group meetings. The participants have migrated from five regions of the world; South‐Eastern Asia, Middle‐Eastern Asia, the African continent, Latin/South America and non‐English speaking countries in Eastern Europe. Data were analysed using an inductive coding using the cultural health capital framework. Findings – The findings reveal that audio and visual personal attributes such as skin colour, accent and excess body weight that are beyond Canadian norms lead to unfavourable interpersonal dynamics. Fundamental causes of diseases and clinical discourses are embedded in ethno‐cultural realties of gender, ethno‐racial identity, English communication styles and immigration related economic downturns. Research limitations/implications – Individual level recommendations include self efficacy and empowerment. Policies and program level recommendations include enhancement of multicultural realms of healthcare to promote equity in healthcare accessibility. Originality/value – Utilization of cultural health capital framework to illustrate inequities in healthcare accessibility, for visible and audible minority immigrant women, living in a country with universal healthcare coverage, brings a novel conceptual approach. New policy implications stemmed from the original research findings. Canadian cultural health capital framework that was developed in this article can be applied to illustrate other minorities' healthcare accessibility.

Journal

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 23, 2012

Keywords: Cultural health capital; Healthcare accessibility; Visible minority immigrant women; Immigrants; Women; Personal health; Canada

References