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In the Eyes of the World

In the Eyes of the World Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 236 OCTOBER 1948 it annually would, they felt, inevitably result in a gradual falling off in interest; which would be a pity in view of the very definite en­ AMI D all the welter of previews, reviews and post-mortems thusiasm that was noticeable this year, particularly in regard to the on the S.B.A.C. Display we felt that if we were to enter the aeroplanes demonstrated. lists with still another domestic write-up of the exhibits the occasion would tend to savour too much of a mere opportunity for Efficient Research mutual back-slapping by the British Aircraft Industry and its sup­ Many of the visitors from abroad took the opportunity of visiting porters. We apprehended that we should be doing greater service to the various firms and Government establishments such as the N.P.L. all concerned if we enlisted the aid of some outside contributor able and experimental stations. One impression, voiced by the American to view the industry and its products from the unprejudiced view­ visitor whom we have already quoted, is perhaps of particular point of a foreign outlook. We therefore invited M. CHARRIOU to interest. It was his first visit to England and the outstanding point write the survey of the exhibition which appears in this issue. He has that had struck him was the very small percentage of individuals the advantage for this purpose not only of being a well-known figure engaged upon research, either Governmentally or in the industry, in French aviation circles, familiar with the industry of that country, compared with the position in this respect in the United States. In but also of having recently visited and seen the products of the rest spite of this, and the very much less elaborate equipment with which of Western Europe as well as of the United States of America. He they were provided, it is his opinion that the results obtained from has, consequently, been able to compare what he saw at Farn- research here are of incomparably greater importance and value than borough with contemporary aeroplanes and ancillary products of those gained in America from very much larger resources. His in­ the principal aircraft-producing nations overseas. triguing explanation of this, on which he was most emphatic, is that if a scientist is given the most modern and lavish equipment with which he can be provided he is apt to fritter away his activities on Recorded Talks devising still more elaborate 'tools'; whereas if he knows that he has Leaving M. CHARRIOU to speak for himself it may not be unin­ to make do with what he is given he has nothing else to do but 'get teresting for us to give here the general effect of the opinions that we on with the job' without distraction and therefore produces the picked up in the course of numerous conversations with other results. He said that although he had been told of the very small visitors from abroad. Here again, we feel that these are more helpful number of research workers employed in this country he had not, and informative than if we were to record merely our own im­ on account of the volume of valuable work done, appreciated the pressions. true facts of the position until he saw it for himself and he was, in In the first place we found very general agreement that this year's consequence, still more impressed by the quality of the results Display constituted a real advance on the two previous, post-war obtained here from the work of, by American standards, almost shows. Farnborough, apart from its distance from London, was ludicrously small staffs. agreed on all sides to be more suited to such an event than Radlett; particularly in view of the universally-approved decision to bring in Lack of Application the general public, for which purpose the aerodrome provides a natural arena. Several visitors with wide experience were filled with He had, however, one serious criticism, of the lack of use made admiration for the organization of the actual flying, which, they said, of the wealth of information obtained. He recalled the fact that we surpassed anything they had hitherto seen in precision and smooth­ have on more than one occasion complained that the published ness of handling. An American commentator considered the Saro results of British research work remain at the level of the senior jet-boat and the Vampire both far in advance of any jet-propelled members of design staffs and do not reach the junior employees aeroplanes America possesses for manoeuvrability and control- whose duty it should be to incorporate the new ideas into the detailed ability. The flying of these two machines, and, in a different style, of design of the aeroplanes on which they are engaged. Our informant the Ambassador, undoubtedly aroused great admiration and that said that he had been very much struck with the obvious soundness of the former, in particular, was obviously a complete revelation to of this criticism and that he considered it a very serious blot on the most of the foreign onlookers. organization of the design side of the British industry. The chief designer, he pointed out, should be responsible for the general There were some comments on the, obviously inevitable, drawback design of the aeroplane, but it is the junior design staffs who should of having the static exhibition split up into two halls so widely be familiar with the most recent knowledge obtained by research distant from each other. In this connexion, several people to whom and ready to introduce it into the prototype of a new machine. we talked were of the opinion that an annual Display gives little Otherwise, he commented, progress will inevitably be less rapid than opportunity for the showing of much in the way of novelties in it could be, as the designer himself cannot possibly busy himself materials, components and accessories and expressed the view that with the incorporation of the newest results of research into every to hold the event in future every other year, possibly to alternate detail of an aeroplane. with the Paris Aero Show, would be sufficient. Continuing to stage http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

In the Eyes of the World

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 20 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1948

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031673
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 236 OCTOBER 1948 it annually would, they felt, inevitably result in a gradual falling off in interest; which would be a pity in view of the very definite en­ AMI D all the welter of previews, reviews and post-mortems thusiasm that was noticeable this year, particularly in regard to the on the S.B.A.C. Display we felt that if we were to enter the aeroplanes demonstrated. lists with still another domestic write-up of the exhibits the occasion would tend to savour too much of a mere opportunity for Efficient Research mutual back-slapping by the British Aircraft Industry and its sup­ Many of the visitors from abroad took the opportunity of visiting porters. We apprehended that we should be doing greater service to the various firms and Government establishments such as the N.P.L. all concerned if we enlisted the aid of some outside contributor able and experimental stations. One impression, voiced by the American to view the industry and its products from the unprejudiced view­ visitor whom we have already quoted, is perhaps of particular point of a foreign outlook. We therefore invited M. CHARRIOU to interest. It was his first visit to England and the outstanding point write the survey of the exhibition which appears in this issue. He has that had struck him was the very small percentage of individuals the advantage for this purpose not only of being a well-known figure engaged upon research, either Governmentally or in the industry, in French aviation circles, familiar with the industry of that country, compared with the position in this respect in the United States. In but also of having recently visited and seen the products of the rest spite of this, and the very much less elaborate equipment with which of Western Europe as well as of the United States of America. He they were provided, it is his opinion that the results obtained from has, consequently, been able to compare what he saw at Farn- research here are of incomparably greater importance and value than borough with contemporary aeroplanes and ancillary products of those gained in America from very much larger resources. His in­ the principal aircraft-producing nations overseas. triguing explanation of this, on which he was most emphatic, is that if a scientist is given the most modern and lavish equipment with which he can be provided he is apt to fritter away his activities on Recorded Talks devising still more elaborate 'tools'; whereas if he knows that he has Leaving M. CHARRIOU to speak for himself it may not be unin­ to make do with what he is given he has nothing else to do but 'get teresting for us to give here the general effect of the opinions that we on with the job' without distraction and therefore produces the picked up in the course of numerous conversations with other results. He said that although he had been told of the very small visitors from abroad. Here again, we feel that these are more helpful number of research workers employed in this country he had not, and informative than if we were to record merely our own im­ on account of the volume of valuable work done, appreciated the pressions. true facts of the position until he saw it for himself and he was, in In the first place we found very general agreement that this year's consequence, still more impressed by the quality of the results Display constituted a real advance on the two previous, post-war obtained here from the work of, by American standards, almost shows. Farnborough, apart from its distance from London, was ludicrously small staffs. agreed on all sides to be more suited to such an event than Radlett; particularly in view of the universally-approved decision to bring in Lack of Application the general public, for which purpose the aerodrome provides a natural arena. Several visitors with wide experience were filled with He had, however, one serious criticism, of the lack of use made admiration for the organization of the actual flying, which, they said, of the wealth of information obtained. He recalled the fact that we surpassed anything they had hitherto seen in precision and smooth­ have on more than one occasion complained that the published ness of handling. An American commentator considered the Saro results of British research work remain at the level of the senior jet-boat and the Vampire both far in advance of any jet-propelled members of design staffs and do not reach the junior employees aeroplanes America possesses for manoeuvrability and control- whose duty it should be to incorporate the new ideas into the detailed ability. The flying of these two machines, and, in a different style, of design of the aeroplanes on which they are engaged. Our informant the Ambassador, undoubtedly aroused great admiration and that said that he had been very much struck with the obvious soundness of the former, in particular, was obviously a complete revelation to of this criticism and that he considered it a very serious blot on the most of the foreign onlookers. organization of the design side of the British industry. The chief designer, he pointed out, should be responsible for the general There were some comments on the, obviously inevitable, drawback design of the aeroplane, but it is the junior design staffs who should of having the static exhibition split up into two halls so widely be familiar with the most recent knowledge obtained by research distant from each other. In this connexion, several people to whom and ready to introduce it into the prototype of a new machine. we talked were of the opinion that an annual Display gives little Otherwise, he commented, progress will inevitably be less rapid than opportunity for the showing of much in the way of novelties in it could be, as the designer himself cannot possibly busy himself materials, components and accessories and expressed the view that with the incorporation of the newest results of research into every to hold the event in future every other year, possibly to alternate detail of an aeroplane. with the Paris Aero Show, would be sufficient. Continuing to stage

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1948

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