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Improving the care of patients without spleens in a district

Improving the care of patients without spleens in a district Patients without spleens are at risk of septicaemia which is largely preventable by vaccination and prophylactic antibiotics as detailed in several recent guidelines. This study sought to identify all people, in one health district, with a previous splenectomy and treat them according to the guidelines on postsplenectomy care. Patients without a spleen were identified by a variety of methods and targeted mailing, manipulation of the local press, opinion leaders, postgraduate meetings, peer pressure, disease and patientspecific reminders, feedback and patient empowerment were all used as dissemination and implementation strategies. The number of patients identified rose from 15 to 68. All were offered the opportunity to discuss their care, 80 took this opportunity and had pneumococcal vaccine, 77 were started on longterm antibiotics, 75 discussed Hib and meningococcal vaccines and these were given to 54. In summary the strategies used dramatically increased the numbers of patients identified and the improved care offered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Effectiveness Emerald Publishing

Improving the care of patients without spleens in a district

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1361-5874
DOI
10.1108/eb020864
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patients without spleens are at risk of septicaemia which is largely preventable by vaccination and prophylactic antibiotics as detailed in several recent guidelines. This study sought to identify all people, in one health district, with a previous splenectomy and treat them according to the guidelines on postsplenectomy care. Patients without a spleen were identified by a variety of methods and targeted mailing, manipulation of the local press, opinion leaders, postgraduate meetings, peer pressure, disease and patientspecific reminders, feedback and patient empowerment were all used as dissemination and implementation strategies. The number of patients identified rose from 15 to 68. All were offered the opportunity to discuss their care, 80 took this opportunity and had pneumococcal vaccine, 77 were started on longterm antibiotics, 75 discussed Hib and meningococcal vaccines and these were given to 54. In summary the strategies used dramatically increased the numbers of patients identified and the improved care offered.

Journal

Journal of Clinical EffectivenessEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1997

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